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‘An Afternoon with Majella’ illuminates mental health

first_imgMajella O’Donnell hosted ‘An Afternoon with Majella’ at An Grianán Theatre as part of Mental Health week which included frank discussions around stress, anxiety and depression.As Mental Health week comes to a close, Shaun Doherty, Ramona Nicholls and many others took to the stage to share their stories and views on the topic of positive mental health.Donegal Mind Wellness is a charity founded by Majella O’Donnell, in conjunction with volunteers and help from the HSE in Donegal. The charity aims to help people deal with the ups and downs of everyday life, which may lead to stress, anxiety and depression, by showing them ways of dealing with these problems.Photo by Clare Mc Cahill.‘An Afternoon with Majella’ illuminates mental health was last modified: October 16th, 2016 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Leicester will stay up – Mourinho

first_imgChelsea manager Jose Mourinho fully expects Wednesday’s opponents Leicester City to avoid relegation from the Premier League this season.The Foxes have climbed to 17th place in the table – one place and one point above the relegation zone – after four consecutive victories.Chelsea, who can move move to within one win of clinching the title with victory at the King Power Stadium, edged a close game 2-0 at Stamford Bridge in August.But they could easily have trailed at the interval and Mourinho has also been impressed by City in the last few games.“I was surprised by their position,” Mourinho said. “I played them earlier in the season and I could feel that they were a good team.“I will not be surprised when they keep the division. They are playing well.“They have options for every position. They have to play at home against teams in the same area as they are.“The game against Chelsea is an extra game. So I think their situation is very good.”When asked about Leicester’s standout player, Mourinho picked Argentine midfielder Esteban Cambiasso – a player who he won the Treble with while Inter Milan boss.“He is phenomenal,” Mourinho said. “He was part of my Golden Team. He is a player who means a lot to me.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Double-crop soybean yields after barley in Northwest Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Eric Richer, CCA, Sarah Noggle, Garth Ruff, Ohio State University ExtensionSeveral growers across the state had the opportunity to grow winter malting barley in 2018. We had the opportunity to work with eight of those growers from Northwest Ohio, in particular, to learn more about the viability of growing this newly, re-introduced crop. As a learning cohort of sorts, these growers agreed to share their yield and quality data results while participating in a simple, field-scale research project with these two objectives:1) Determine the field-scale, simple averages for yield (grain & straw), harvest date and quality characteristics for barley grown in Northwest Ohio.Simply put: Can we grow barley with high yield and good quality?2) Compare the yield and plant/harvest dates for the same variety soybean as a i) first crop system, ii) double crop after barley system and iii) double crop after wheat system.Simply put: What will the double-crop soybeans yield in this barley system?The first objective from above was answered in an article we wrote in the CORN newsletter here https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-30/northwest-ohio-field-scale-barley-yield-results. To summarize, the barley data over nine sites in 2018 shows these averages for the variety Puffin: harvest date of June 26th, barley yield of 86.5 bushels per acre, straw yield of 1.01 ton per acre and barley quality of 11.6% protein, 98.5% germination, 87.5% plumpness and .45 ppm DON.In this article, we would like to focus on the soybean data associated with this study. The data presented below was based on one growing season and should be interpreted as such.Study designEach barley grower in the cohort was asked to plant a “paired-site” field of first crop soybeans adjacent to their barley field with the goal of comparing yields of double crop soybeans after barley to the of first crop soybeans (check). Eight growers utilizing eleven different variety comparisons (sites) participated in these paired sites. Additionally, four growers utilizing five variety comparisons (sites) had a wheat field adjacent to or nearby these paired sites and planted double crop soybeans after wheat. One could consider the double-crop soybeans after wheat a more important “check” than first crop soybeans. It may depend on your perspective or whether you are a wheat grower or not.Growers were asked to use the same soybean variety in each scenario to eliminate varietal differences. Soybeans maturities ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 and several trait platforms were used (non-GMO, Roundup, Xtend, and Liberty) based on the grower’s preference.One of the notable considerations for planting barley—especially for Northern Ohio—is the possibility of planting double crop soybeans 6-10 days earlier than one would normally plant after wheat. In 2018, the average planting date for first crop soybeans was May 22 with an average as planted seeding rate of 175,000 seeds/acre. The average planting date for soybeans after barley was July 1 with an average seeding rate of 187,000 seeds/acre. The soybeans planted after wheat had a July 7 average at an average seeding rate of 197,000 seeds/acre. In this production year across these sites, the double crop soybeans after barley only gained 6 days as compared to those sites that had double crop soybeans after wheat. Additionally, all growers in the cohort felt strongly that removal of the straw made for more effective double crop soybean planting.Yield ResultsAll sites were harvested for yield over nearly two months’ time due to challenging weather. All yields reported were standardized to 13% moisture. First crop soybeans yielded 59.3 bushels per acre with a 14.0% harvest moisture and had an average harvest date of October 17. The soybeans after barley yielded 36.6 bushels per acre with an 18.7% harvest moisture and had an average harvest date of November 17. Finally, the soybeans after wheat yielded 19.5 bushels per acre with a harvest moisture of 17.8% and an average harvest date of November 29.Barley Growing ConsiderationsThe decision to raise a new crop like barley should be based on the information gathered by each producer, how that particular crop fits into each operation, having a contract and delivery point in place prior to planting, and the overall profitability of the enterprise. Barley may or may not be for your farm. It does allow a grower to add crop diversity to the rotation while using existing equipment (grain drill, sprayer, combine). However, growing a food grade, identity preserved (IP) crop requires specified quality standards and segregated storage as compared to commodity crops. Additionally, the planting and harvesting logistics for barley may not fit into all operations. The list of advantages and disadvantages is much more extensive but these could be observed as some of the most important.SummaryIn summary, much is yet to be learned on barley production in Northwest Ohio. Yield data from this growers’ cohort suggests that double crop soybean yield after barley can be significantly better than soybean yield after wheat. While this article contains just one year of data from eight growers, it will start to answer the question of whether winter barley is a viable option for farmers in Northwest Ohio. For information on management, visit https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/winter-malting-barley and search for the Extension publication Management of Ohio Winter Malting Barley. For more information on this research study, download the eFields 2018 Report, pp 174-175 at www.go.osu.edu/efields.The authors wish to thank the cooperators from Defiance, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, and Paulding Counties who participated in this learning cohort. We hope to repeat it again in 2019 and if you are growing winter barley for harvest in 2019 and would like to be part of the cohort, send inquiries to [email protected] or [email protected]last_img read more

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Is Compressed Fiberglass Insulation Really a Problem?

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESInstalling Fiberglass RightGBA Encyclopedia: Batt and Blanket InsulationGrading the Installation Quality of Insulation Fiberglass Insulation Manufacturer Tackles Installation Quality I’ve been guilty of perpetuating a myth. Not long ago I wrote an article in which I said installing insulation, “cavities [should be] filled completely with as little compression as possible.” But is compression really such a bad thing? Here on GBA, commenter Dana Dorsett wrote, “Compression of batts is fine (resulting in a higher R/inch due to the higher density) as long as the cavity is completely filled.”He’s right. Compression isn’t the problem. Incompletely filled cavities are a problem. Gaps are a problem. But you can compress fiberglass insulation quite a bit and it still works just fine. The North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) has a little two-page document about compressing fiberglass insulation. Here’s what NAIMA says: “When you compress fiber glass batt insulation, the R-value per inch goes up, but the overall R-value goes down because you have less inches or thickness of insulation.”The document includes a general chart for how to tell what your R-value is with different levels of compression. Owens Corning also has a compression chart for R-value (see Image #2, below). So, you don’t get the full R-value on the label, but the insulation still works perfectly well if all you’ve done is compress it. Of course there are limits. If you use a hydraulic press to compress it so much that it approaches the density of solid glass, things change. We’re talking about reasonable amounts of compression.Here’s something you may not know. The standard R-19 fiberglass batt is 6.25 inches thick. If you put that batt in a closed 2×6 wall, it will be compressed 0.75 inch because a 2×6 is 5.5 inches deep. That means the batt labeled R-19 really gives you R-18 in a closed cavity.One place where you’re pretty much always going to end up with compression is around windows. If you use backer rod in the gap around a window and then fill the remaining space with chinked fiberglass, “it’s damned near impossible to compress the fiberglass ‘too much,’ without using a hammer!” That’s what Dana Dorsett wrote in his GBA comment to me.Another is behind electrical junction boxes. If you install fiberglass correctly, you need to cut notches in the insulation where it goes around junction boxes. You can then take that little rectangular piece of insulation and put it in the space between the junction box and the exterior sheathing. You don’t need to worry about removing some of the insulation so you can do it without compression. Just put the whole piece back there and let it be compressed.So, compress if you need to. Just make sure the space is completely filled. That’s the real measure of a good installation. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

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Farmers clash with U.P. police

first_imgFarmers, demanding better compensation for their land acquired for a residential project here, clashed with the police on Saturday when government officials visited the site to clear encroachment.Several injured Several farmers were injured as police lathicharged the protesters, used tear gas and water cannons. Many policemen, including the Additional SP, were also injured as the protesters threw stones at them, District Magistrate Devendra Kumar Pandey said. The farmers are demanding better compensation for their land acquired for the Trans-Ganga City project, an upcoming township near Kanpur. Mr. Pandey, however, said the farmers have been adequately compensated. “There is a faction of anti-social elements who are misleading the farmers and others for their selfish motives, despite the fact that their grievances have already been resolved,” he said.Two arrested Those who threw stones are mostly anti-social elements, Mr. Pandey said, adding that two people have been arrested in connection with the incident. Local BJP MLA Pankaj Gupta, who went to the spot on coming to know of the clash, asked officials to resolve the matter.last_img read more

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