Tag: 上海贵族宝贝花千坊419

Drawing may help find knife attacker

first_imgLANCASTER – Sheriff’s detectives have released a composite drawing of a short, fat, white or Latino man who last week stabbed and robbed a man coming out of a Lancaster doughnut shop. The 63-year-old stabbing victim remained hospitalized Tuesday under intensive care. “It’s pretty severe,” Detective Kevin Turrill said about the wound. The victim was stabbed and robbed about 9 p.m. Thursday as he was walking across a parking lot in the 800 block of East Avenue K. The assailant greeted him, then attacked without warning and stabbed him in the back, deputies said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! As the victim lay on the ground, the assailant took cash from his pockets and ran off. The assailant was described as a dark-haired man with a goatee and very fair skin, in his early or middle 20s, about 5 feet 4 to 5 feet 6 in height and weighing 250 to 300 pounds. He spoke with a slight accent and has a tattoo on his forearm. He was wearing an oversize white T-shirt and dark pants. Anyone with information was asked to call Turrill at the Lancaster sheriff’s station at (661) 948-8466. last_img read more

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Double-crop soybean yields after barley in Northwest Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Eric Richer, CCA, Sarah Noggle, Garth Ruff, Ohio State University ExtensionSeveral growers across the state had the opportunity to grow winter malting barley in 2018. We had the opportunity to work with eight of those growers from Northwest Ohio, in particular, to learn more about the viability of growing this newly, re-introduced crop. As a learning cohort of sorts, these growers agreed to share their yield and quality data results while participating in a simple, field-scale research project with these two objectives:1) Determine the field-scale, simple averages for yield (grain & straw), harvest date and quality characteristics for barley grown in Northwest Ohio.Simply put: Can we grow barley with high yield and good quality?2) Compare the yield and plant/harvest dates for the same variety soybean as a i) first crop system, ii) double crop after barley system and iii) double crop after wheat system.Simply put: What will the double-crop soybeans yield in this barley system?The first objective from above was answered in an article we wrote in the CORN newsletter here https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2018-30/northwest-ohio-field-scale-barley-yield-results. To summarize, the barley data over nine sites in 2018 shows these averages for the variety Puffin: harvest date of June 26th, barley yield of 86.5 bushels per acre, straw yield of 1.01 ton per acre and barley quality of 11.6% protein, 98.5% germination, 87.5% plumpness and .45 ppm DON.In this article, we would like to focus on the soybean data associated with this study. The data presented below was based on one growing season and should be interpreted as such.Study designEach barley grower in the cohort was asked to plant a “paired-site” field of first crop soybeans adjacent to their barley field with the goal of comparing yields of double crop soybeans after barley to the of first crop soybeans (check). Eight growers utilizing eleven different variety comparisons (sites) participated in these paired sites. Additionally, four growers utilizing five variety comparisons (sites) had a wheat field adjacent to or nearby these paired sites and planted double crop soybeans after wheat. One could consider the double-crop soybeans after wheat a more important “check” than first crop soybeans. It may depend on your perspective or whether you are a wheat grower or not.Growers were asked to use the same soybean variety in each scenario to eliminate varietal differences. Soybeans maturities ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 and several trait platforms were used (non-GMO, Roundup, Xtend, and Liberty) based on the grower’s preference.One of the notable considerations for planting barley—especially for Northern Ohio—is the possibility of planting double crop soybeans 6-10 days earlier than one would normally plant after wheat. In 2018, the average planting date for first crop soybeans was May 22 with an average as planted seeding rate of 175,000 seeds/acre. The average planting date for soybeans after barley was July 1 with an average seeding rate of 187,000 seeds/acre. The soybeans planted after wheat had a July 7 average at an average seeding rate of 197,000 seeds/acre. In this production year across these sites, the double crop soybeans after barley only gained 6 days as compared to those sites that had double crop soybeans after wheat. Additionally, all growers in the cohort felt strongly that removal of the straw made for more effective double crop soybean planting.Yield ResultsAll sites were harvested for yield over nearly two months’ time due to challenging weather. All yields reported were standardized to 13% moisture. First crop soybeans yielded 59.3 bushels per acre with a 14.0% harvest moisture and had an average harvest date of October 17. The soybeans after barley yielded 36.6 bushels per acre with an 18.7% harvest moisture and had an average harvest date of November 17. Finally, the soybeans after wheat yielded 19.5 bushels per acre with a harvest moisture of 17.8% and an average harvest date of November 29.Barley Growing ConsiderationsThe decision to raise a new crop like barley should be based on the information gathered by each producer, how that particular crop fits into each operation, having a contract and delivery point in place prior to planting, and the overall profitability of the enterprise. Barley may or may not be for your farm. It does allow a grower to add crop diversity to the rotation while using existing equipment (grain drill, sprayer, combine). However, growing a food grade, identity preserved (IP) crop requires specified quality standards and segregated storage as compared to commodity crops. Additionally, the planting and harvesting logistics for barley may not fit into all operations. The list of advantages and disadvantages is much more extensive but these could be observed as some of the most important.SummaryIn summary, much is yet to be learned on barley production in Northwest Ohio. Yield data from this growers’ cohort suggests that double crop soybean yield after barley can be significantly better than soybean yield after wheat. While this article contains just one year of data from eight growers, it will start to answer the question of whether winter barley is a viable option for farmers in Northwest Ohio. For information on management, visit https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/winter-malting-barley and search for the Extension publication Management of Ohio Winter Malting Barley. For more information on this research study, download the eFields 2018 Report, pp 174-175 at www.go.osu.edu/efields.The authors wish to thank the cooperators from Defiance, Fulton, Hancock, Henry, and Paulding Counties who participated in this learning cohort. We hope to repeat it again in 2019 and if you are growing winter barley for harvest in 2019 and would like to be part of the cohort, send inquiries to [email protected] or [email protected]last_img read more

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What’s the Deal with Vitamin B12?

first_imgby Christian Maino-Vieytes, B.S. Nutritional Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, M.S. Candidate, Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignVitamin B12 represents an essential nutrient involved in energy metabolism. It forms what we in the field of nutrition call a co-enzyme­. It is a necessary component of certain enzymes, the miniscule proteins in our body responsible for carrying out all of the chemical reactions that keep us alive. Think of it as being analogous to a spark plug that allows a car to turn on and combust fuel. Without it, the car will not work.We often hear about the dangers of developing a vitamin B12 deficiency from physicians, other providers, or the media. In fact, a B12 deficiency can be a very serious predicament. Knowledge about symptoms as well as how to prevent such a deficiency from occurring in the first place is crucial.What are the sources of vitamin B12? A common misconception is that vitamin B12 originates in animal products. Nevertheless, just like us humans, other mammals that we consume need an exogenous source of B12 as well. Their cells and tissues cannot produce this critical vitamin. Vitamin B12 originates in the soil. Specifically, it is made by bacteria living in the soil that interact with various root systems. The animals that we consume for nutrition be it cow meat or poultry obtain their B12 by ingesting soil particles along with their normal feed. A long time ago, our primordial ancestors were likely getting their B12 through similar means. Needless to say, this method of soil consumption for obtaining B12 in today’s modern world seems a little impractical and outdated.Given that other animals do the dirty work for us (no pun intended), we consume their meat and obtain a recycled form of B12 that is adequate. The majority of individuals rinse and clean their vegetables thoroughly before consumption. This aspect of modern life coupled with the fact that we drink from a purified source of water puts vegetarians and vegans at an increased risk of developing a vitamin B12 deficiency.What happens during vitamin B12 Deficiency? Vitamin B12 is fundamental for the proper functioning of red blood cells, the nerve cells that make up your central nervous system, and for DNA production. Accordingly, the symptoms of deficiency relate to these systems and include:AnemiaMood swings that can lead to depressionFatigueDifficulty concentratingWeaknessMouth and tongue ulcersVitamin B12 Supplementation Medical authorities recommend that those who partake in vegetarian or vegan eating patterns take weekly or daily supplementation. Those in the elderly population are also at risk for deficiency. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence suggests that B12 deficiency significantly affects omnivores as well and up to 20% of the population may have low vitamin B12 levels. Accordingly, many physicians and dietitians recommend that all individuals consume some form of supplemental B12, especially given that B12 toxicity is not very common and any excess is expelled through the urine. Most multivitamin supplements contain B12 as part of their formulations. In addition to animal products and supplementation, vitamin B12 can be found in many cereals and other products, such as Nutritional Yeast, that are fortified with this essential vitamin.BibliographyAllen, Lindsay H. “How common is vitamin B-12 deficiency?–.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 89.2 (2008): 693S-696S.Andrès, Emmanuel, et al. “Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency in elderly patients.” Canadian Medical Association Journal 171.3 (2004): 251-259.Bor, Mustafa Vakur, et al. “Daily intake of 4 to 7 μg dietary vitamin B-12 is associated with steady concentrations of vitamin B-12–related biomarkers in a healthy young population–.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 91.3 (2010): 571-577.Greger, M. (2011, August 30). Vitamin B12: How much, how often? Retrieved from https://nutritionfacts.org/2011/08/30/3964/Heyssel, R. M., et al. “Vitamin B12 turnover in man. The assimilation of vitamin B12 from natural foodstuff by man and estimates of minimal daily dietary requirements.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 18 (1966): 176-184.Watanabe, Fumio. “Vitamin B12 sources and bioavailability.” Experimental Biology and Medicine 232.10 (2007): 1266-1274.Watanabe, Fumio, and Tomohiro Bito. “Vitamin B12 sources and microbial interaction.” Experimental Biology and Medicine243.2 (2018): 148-158.last_img read more

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Boat capsizes in U.P., four missing

first_imgA boat carrying 18 persons capsized in the Ghagra river in Sant Kabir district of eastern Uttar Pradesh, police said on Saturday.It was carrying local farmers who were travelling to the fields.While 14 persons have been rescued, the remaining four are still missing, the police said. “We are searching for the four persons with the help of divers,” said the Sant Kabir Nagar police.Senior district officials and police officers are on the spot.Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath took cognisance of the incident and directed the officials to ensure immediate help to the victims with the help of the State Disaster Response Force.last_img read more

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County flu death toll rises to 24 with eight more deaths last

first_img KUSI Newsroom Updated: 6:19 PM KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Complications for the flu resulted in the deaths of eight San Diego County residents ranging in age from 27 to 85 last week, health officials reported Wednesday.Among the deaths was a 32-year-old North County man without medical issues and a 27-year-old South County man who had additional medical issues. Five of the other six residents who died also had medical issues in addition to the flu. The county did not report if any of them had been vaccinated.The deaths bring the county’s flu season death toll to 24, a far cry from the 174 deaths reported at this time last season. According to the county’s weekly flu report for the week of Jan. 13-19, the county has lab- confirmed 3,097 flu cases so far this flu season, compared to 13,644 at this time last year.County health officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly advise the annual flu vaccination for everyone 6 months and older, especially demographics with a heightened risk of serious complications, such as pregnant women, people older than 65 and people with chronic conditions.“Healthy young people should not be dying from influenza. That’s why it’s so important to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Sayone Thihalolipavan, the county’s deputy public health officer. “If you have not gotten a flu shot, do it now.”Flu shots are available at doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, community clinics and the county’s public health centers. Residents can also call 211 or visit the county’s immunization program website, sdiz.com, for a list of county locations administering free vaccines. Posted: January 23, 2019center_img January 23, 2019 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter County flu death toll rises to 24 with eight more deaths last weeklast_img read more

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