Tag: 上海可乐和毒药哪个好

Although released, Nguyen Dan Que and Nguyen Dinh Huy are not free

first_img April 27, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders welcomed the release from prison of Nguyen Dan Que and Nguyen Dinh Huy on 2 February, both now returned to their homes in Ho Chi Minh City. The organisation pointed out that three other dissidents remain behind bars simply for their online criticism of the government. RSF_en Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison Follow the news on Vietnam News VietnamAsia – Pacific Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam Cyber-dissident Nguyen Dan Que and journalist Nguyen Dinh Huy, who were released from prison on 2 February, are being kept under constant police surveillance, Reporters Without Borders said today, calling for them to be allowed to fully enjoy their freedom. Both spent more than 15 years in prison.Dinh Huy is being so closely watched that there are even two policeman inside his home in Ho Chi Minh City. All his telephone calls are monitored.Two plain-clothes are constantly watching Dan Que’s home. When he went out a few days after his release, the authorities immediately telephoned his wife to ask why he had gone out and tell her that he should henceforth warn them whenever he went out.———————————-3.02.05Cyberdissident Nguyen Dan Que and journalist Nguyen Dinh Huy releasedReporters Without Borders welcomed the release from prison on 2 February of Dr Nguyen Dan Que and journalist Nguyen Dinh Huy, aged 73. The organisation said it hoped the two would be able to resume a normal life free of police surveillance and harassment. It also pointed out that three other dissidents – Nguyen Vu Binh, Pham Hong Son and Nguyen Khac Toan – were still behind bars simply for having posted articles online critical of the government. “In less than eight months, the Vietnamese authorities have released four of the seven jailed cyberdissidents as well as the last journalist imprisoned. However, at the same time they brutally cracked down on a section of the online press because it was reflecting popular discontent.”It is therefore not yet possible to see these releases as a sign of a softening of the regime towards free expression,” it said.Nguyen Dan Que, held in Prison n°5 in Thanh Hoa Province about 200 kilometres south of Hanoi, arrived back home in Ho Chi Minh City the following day while Dinh Huy returned to the same city accompanied by his family.Dan Que had been arrested at his home on 17 March 2003. A committed free expression campaigner, he had already spent more than 18 years in prison between 1980 and 1998.Shortly before his imprisonment he had released a statement in which he condemned the lack of press freedom in the country. He was sentenced on 29 July 2004, to 30 months in prison by a court in Ho Chi Minh City. He was denied the right to legal representation.Dinh Huy was arrested on 17 November 1993, after asking permission to hold a conference on democracy in Ho Chi Minh City. In April 1995, he was sentenced to 15 years for attempting to “overthrow the people’s government”. He was imprisoned at Ham Tan camp, around 100 kms north-east of Ho Chi Minh City. Cyberdissidents Pham Que Duong and Tran Khue were released respectively on 29 and 30 July 2004. Le Chi Quang was freed from jail on 14 June.Two cyberdissidents and one former journalist remain in prison Help by sharing this information April 7, 2021 Find out more Organisation center_img News News to go further RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang Businessman Nguyen Khac Toan, a former army officer, was arrested on 8 January 2002, in a Hanoi cybercafé. He was accused of emailing information to Vietnamese human rights organisations in exile, seen by the government as “reactionary”. Found guilty of espionage, he was sentenced, on 20 December 2002, to 12 years in prison and three years under house arrest. For several months he has been refused the right to leave his cell, as punishment for making “insolent” remarks.Nguyen Vu Binh, former journalist on an official Vietnamese Communist party publication Tap Chi Cong San (Communist Reviews), was arrested on 25 September 2002. He was chiefly accused of posting articles online of a “reactionary nature”, in particular an essay entitled, “Reflection on the Sino-Vietnamese border accords” in which he criticised a treaty concluded between China and Vietnam in 1999. He was sentenced on 31 December 2003 to seven years in prison and three years house arrest. The sentence was confirmed on appeal on 5 May 2004.Pham Hong Son, a doctor and head of a pharmaceutical firm, was imprisoned on 27 March 2002 for having translated and posted online an article headlined, “What is democracy?”, taken from web pages on the site of the US embassy in Vietnam.Previously, he had written several articles promoting democracy and human rights, posted on Vietnamese discussion forums. In June 2003 a people’s court in Hanoi sentenced him to 13 years in prison for “espionage” and three years house arrest. His sentence was reduced on appeal on 26 August 2003, to five years imprisonment and three years house arrest.He is suffering from a hernia in the groin which could be life-threatening in the absence of an operation. He has not been receiving any treatment and he was transferred in September 2004, to a detention centre far from Hanoi, where his family lives.Over 15 years ago, Reporters without Borders created its “Sponsorship Programme” and called upon the international media to select and support an imprisoned journalist. More than two hundreds news staffs around the globe are thus sponsoring colleagues by regularly petitioning authorities for their release and by publicising their situations so that their cases will not be forgotten.Currently, Nguyen Dinh Huy is sponsored by La Manche libre, le Club de la presse de Bordeaux, Le Devoir, Charlie Hebdo, Le Matin, RFI, Verbottenswuriren, Maison de la presse de Liège, Fun Radio (Belgique), El País, RTVE, Europa Press, Grupo Arbol News April 22, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts February 9, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Although released, Nguyen Dan Que and Nguyen Dinh Huy are not free VietnamAsia – Pacific last_img read more

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Court’s workload on the rise

first_imgCourt’s workload on the rise A special commission appointed to study the Supreme Court’s workload will find by most measures the court’s burden has risen significantly in the past 10 years, according to statistics from the State Courts Administrator’s office. But compared with other top state courts around the country, the Florida court is busy, but not nearly the busiest, according to some national data. The legislature created the nine-member panel to look at the court’s workload after another bill, which would have sent to voters a constitutional amendment to increase the court’s size by two, bogged down and appeared unlikely to pass. The statistics show mostly, but not entirely, upward trends. Mandatory reviews are actually lower, but discretionary reviews have risen markedly. Higher too are the actions where the court hears the matter as an original proceeding. Overall, the total number of filings have showed a steady increase from 1990 to 1999: 1,920 to 2,746. That’s a 43-percent increase. Dispositions have also shown a more or less steady increase, going from 1,846 in 1990 to 2,516 in 1999, a 36-percent rise. Pending cases have gone from 970 in 1990 to 1,328 in 1999, a 37 percent hike. Interestingly, the entire rise in workload is due to orders, and the number of opinions issued by the court has been decreasing. In 1990, the court issued 382 opinions and for the next four years it topped 400 per year including one year with 506. But since 1995, the court has issued no more than 381 opinions in any one year, including 1999 when 218 opinions were issued, the least by far of the decade. From 1990 to 1994, the court averaged 446 opinions a year. From 1995 through 1999, it averaged 327. The opposite was true for orders issued, which rose more or less steadily from 1,464 in 1990 to 2,298 in 1999, or 57 percent. The court has seen a remarkable rise in extraordinary writ petitions, especially in the last four years. From 1990 through 1995, the number of petitions ranged from 256 to 455. Since 1996, it’s never been less than 730, and the number reached 860 for 1999. Roughly 55 to 60 percent of the extraordinary writ petitions were habeas corpus and 25 to 30 percent were mandamus. According to 1998 figures from the National Center for State Courts, the Florida Supreme Court has a fairly typical workload for larger states. In 1998, it had 2,404 total filings, or 343 per justice. That was far below California, where seven justices got 1,232 filings each, or a total of 8,627. Illinois had 2,309 filings, or 330 per justice, Michigan had 2,426 or 347 per justice, Ohio had 1,848 or 264 per justice, Pennsylvania had 3,113 or 445 per justice and New York had 4,466, or 638 per justice. All of those states, like Florida, have seven justices. A special case is Texas, where the Supreme Court has the final say on civil appeals and the separate Court of Criminal Appeals has the final say on criminal cases. Both have nine justices. In 1998, the Supreme Court had 1,329 filings, or 203 per justice, and the Court of Criminal Appeals had 1,983 filings, or 220 per justice. (The statistics looked at raw filings, and not the labor required to dispose of the different types of filings or the differing jurisdictions between various supreme courts.) Nineteen courts of last resort had five justices, according to the statistics. Twenty-six had seven justices, eight had nine justices (including both of the Texas courts of last resort) and one had eight. (The total is more than 50 because Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia were counted and Oklahoma, like Texas, has a separate civil and criminal court of last resort. ) Twelve states, all smaller ones, reported no intermediate appellate courts between trial courts and their supreme courts. All reported relatively low caseloads for their justices, except for West Virginia, whose five justices had 683 filings each, or a total of 3,415. One irony was shown in the state statistics. While the Florida Supreme Court has come under fire from some lawmakers for finding some new laws unconstitutional, the numbers from the State Courts Administrator show that type of action on mandatory reviews for statutory or constitutional validity have sharply declined in the last decade. From 1990 to 1994, the court did over 100 such mandatory reviews each year, averaging 140 a year. Since then, the court has never done more than 30 in one year, and that was 1999. In discretional statutory validity reviews, the court did between 24 and 43 a year between 1990 and 1999, with no apparent increasing or decreasing trend. On discretional constitutional reviews, the court did between 24 and 55 a year from 1990 to 1996. In the past three years, it’s been 61 or 62 cases a year. June 1, 2000 Regular News Court’s workload on the riselast_img read more

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Fast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 83-73 loss at Virginia Tech

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 10, 2017 at 9:07 pm Contact Paul: [email protected] | @pschweds BLACKSBURG, Va. — Syracuse (10-7, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) dropped to .500 in the ACC with a 83-73 loss to Virginia Tech (13-3, 2-2) on Tuesday night at Cassell Coliseum. The Orange fell behind by as many as 15 and never recovered despite a late comeback attempt.Here are three takeaways from the game.Syracuse’s interior defense struggledThe Orange allowed Virginia Tech bigs Zach LeDay and Chris Clarke to get free in the low post and it resulted in several uncontested baskets, especially early in the first half. They combined for three easy dunks in the first eight minutes of the game off passes from the outside. As the half continued, Syracuse’s wings — often Tyler Roberson, Andrew White or Tyler Lydon — began pinching in.With the center — Lydon or Taurean Thompson — sliding up to cover the high post, the wings defended the low post. The adjustment worked a bit after that, but Clarke and LeDay still combined for 20 first-half points.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIn the second half, the Orange’s defense tightened up, but the duo still finished with 39 combined points. After Syracuse cut the deficit to three with 10 minutes left, LeDay got into the sweet spot again and finished.Even with less space to operate, LeDay and Clarke slipped into the holes.Tyler Lydon ineffective after taking a fallLate in the first half, Syracuse sophomore forward Tyler Lydon fell down while attempting a fadeaway baseline jumper. He got up limping with an apparent lower left leg injury and tried to get back on defense, but the Hokies scored before he could get back, unable to run at full speed.Lydon finished with just two points, tied for a season-low. He played throughout the second half, until being subbed out in the last four mintues, but didn’t appear to be running at full speed. With Syracuse trailing, 54-48, he attempted a 3 from the top of the key but it rimmed out.While Lydon wasn’t effective, the rest of the Orange’s offense struggled as well.Orange’s offense hits a wallVirginia Tech went on an 8-0 run early in the second half to open up a 12-point lead. The run came mostly as a result of Syracuse miscues. An airball by White, a travel by White and a ball thrown into traffic that left Battle scrambling on the floor led to opportunities for the Hokies.Virginia Tech’s Ahmed Hill hit a corner 3 in front of his bench to make it 45-33 with 16 minutes to play. Syracuse was forced to call a timeout and while the Orange cut the deficit to as few as three points, it could never get over the hump.The Hokies scored 17 points off turnovers, a reflection of how the Orange’s miscues led to easy baskets. Commentslast_img read more

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Sydney O’Hara looks to strengthen arsenal with changeup

first_img Published on February 8, 2017 at 10:08 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] The pitcher who does everything “zero to 100” said she finally feels comfortable slowing down.Despite Sydney O’Hara’s struggles with her changeup, she believes she found a new off-speed pitch that works. It’s slower than most changeups and has a sharp downward movement after the release. O’Hara calls her pitch “the suitcase,” and hopes to frighten opposing hitters with it in her senior season at Syracuse.Last year, O’Hara led the Atlantic Coast Conference with a 1.47 earned run average in 62 innings. Now, she’s developing a changeup to add to her arsenal. She’ll experiment with it on Friday in the season opener against East Carolina in the Red and Black Showcase in Athens, Georgia.When O’Hara was 12, she eyed her head coach, Bennett. O’Hara leered grudgingly at Bennett. He gave her a task she wanted no part of. O’Hara, who was a budding seventh grade star, was not yet comfortable throwing off-speed pitches. But Bennett wanted to see more out of his pitcher. So this summer league game, she could not throw the curveball that she favored, nor the riser that she worked on. Instead, Bennett wanted O’Hara to throw a full game using only a changeup.“It was so frustrating,” O’Hara said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor years, O’Hara hadn’t found a changeup that worked. As a 12-year-old, her coach, Kerry Bennett, forced her to develop her changeup, which she used sparingly. O’Hara kept in in her vault, but after an injury in her sophomore year at SU, she stopped throwing it.That year, O’Hara developed a pain in her inner right elbow, yet continued to pitch with it. After seeking medical treatment, O’Hara was diagnosed with Golfer’s Elbow and tendonitis in her right arm, and a small tear in her Medial Collateral Ligament. Her doctor shut her down for six months. She hasn’t thrown her changeup much since.Through her first three years at SU, she relied on her riser and two different curveballs: a regular curve and a backdoor curve. Over her softball career, O’Hara tried working with more than 20 different changeups, but not one worked.“In my whole college career, I probably threw it like thirty times,” O’Hara said. “And I’m a senior…. My changeup in years past would probably go floating over the backstop. It was bad.”But O’Hara enters 2017 as one of the ACC’s top arms. SU head coach Mike Bosch said she needs another off-speed pitch to thrive in one of softball’s toughest conferences. Bosch said difficulties with a changeup stem from her mechanics. She jerks, with a fast and excited release. She also works fast, which may contribute to her awkward release.“I’m not smooth at all,” O’Hara said.She has worked with repetition after repetition, mastering the position and the follow-through. She trained further by recreating live situations and testing the changeup against her teammates. She said her motion looks like swinging a suitcase out in front of her. So far in practice, she has induced ground balls to third base and weak dribblers across the infield.It isn’t the flashiest pitch, but it could get the outs she needs. Bosch plans to call on O’Hara’s changeup. Before this season, O’Hara hated throwing a changeup. Now she’s begging to get more opportunities with “the suitcase.”“I want to get better at it,” O’Hara said. “I want to be more effective than I have been in years past.” Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Wellington Police Notes (including Click it or Ticket violations): Tuesday, May 20, 2014

first_imgEditor’s note: It is standard policy of Sumner Newscow to not print juvenile names in the police notes and court dockets for criminal behavior or minor accidents. However, because the Click it or Ticket program is aimed more as an educational and preventive program, we will include names of juveniles as far as seatbelt violations are concerned. Wellington Police notes for Tuesday, May 20, 2014•7:17 a.m. Randall  D. McPhail, 20, Wellington was issued  a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•7:30 a.m. Donna D. Williams, 57, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•7:50 a.m. Lindsey A. Garmon,29,Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with drivers license violation, no seat belt and no proof of insurance.•8:00 a.m. Andy M. Korte, 24, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•8:19 a.m. Mark J. McClure, 38, Wichita, was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•8:25 a.m. Gary P, Grupp, 34, Wichita was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•8:25 a.m. Matthew W. West, 24, Wichita was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt by a passenger.•8:50 a.m. Tami J. Gansbauer, 28, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•9 a.m. Sandra  K. Cobb, 60, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•9:08 a.m. Eric D. Watts, 26, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•9:28 a.m.  Don S. Campbell, 58, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with no seatbelt.•9:44 a.m. Jill K. Turek, 43, South Haven was issued a notice to appear charged with no Seatbelt.•11:55 a.m.  Michael W. Washington Jr., 38, Wellington was arrested and confined on a Sedgwick County warrant.•1:26 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of a trailer in the 200 block of E. Mill.•3:07 p.m. Kristopher M. Green, 35, Udall was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation by a passenger.•3:21 p.m. Charles F. Fry, 63, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•3:30 p.m. Thomas A. Studnicka, 43, Belle Plaine, was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•3:39 p.m. Robert D. Nickel, 68, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•3:50 p.m. Bonnie L. Guerra, 46, Caldwell was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•3:50 p.m. Weigend A. Guerra, 21, Caldwell was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation by a passenger.•4:06 p.m. Seth T. Henton, 36, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•4:24 p.m. Bobbie L. Rayburn, 61, Clearwater was arrested and confined on a municipal warrant from Derby, Ks.•4:41 p.m. Vincent Macias, 72, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation and no proof of insurance.•4:54 p.m. Tonya K. Hunsucker, 20, Winfield, was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•5:05 p.m. Camron J. Wacker, 42, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•5:17 p.m. Brian L. Marshall, 44, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•5:35 p.m. Kevin W. Gentry, 30,Viola was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•5:56 p.m. Jesse A. Deason, 29,Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation.•5:56 p.m. Matthew R. Deason, 33, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation of a passenger.•6:24 p.m. Debra L. Schmidt, 60, Wellington was issued a notice to  appear charged with seatbelt violaton.•6:42 p.m. Brian W. Trainer, 31, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with seatbelt violation and driving in violation of restriction.last_img read more

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STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 23, 2015

first_imgJACOBSON A ‘NEW OLD FACE’ AT SANTA ANITA David Jacobson was in his teens when his father sent him to work with Bobby Frankel at Santa Anita four decades ago. Now he’s here from the East Coast with a string of his own for the marquee Winter Meet that starts Saturday.Jacobson has a multitude of memories of Frankel, who will be honored Sunday with the running of the Grade III Robert J. Frankel Stakes, named for the late Hall of Fame trainer who died Nov. 16, 2009, at the age of 68.“I wish I had a horse to run in there, but I don’t,” Jacobson said. “Bobby was really good to me and very close with my father back in the day. It brings back memories when I see his picture hanging at Clockers’ Corner. Frankel was a trendsetter.”David’s father was Hall of Fame trainer Buddy Jacobson, who died in May 1989 at 58.Multiple graded stakes winner Salutos Amigos is among the horses Jacobson has at Santa Anita. He is scheduled to run in the Grade III Midnight Lute Stakes at 6 ½ furlongs on the main track Jan. 2.“I came out here for the weather and the free coffee,” Jacobson said, joshing about the hot cups of java now available gratis at Clockers’ Corner. “Seriously, the racing looks good and I have some horses that fit.“I was at Santa Anita in the 70s as an assistant with Bobby when my father sent me out here, and I’ve had fond memories of Santa Anita ever since. (Santa Anita Racing Director) Mike (Lakow) approached me and I decided to give it a shot and see what goes. Right now I’ve got 15 horses here and another 10 coming at the beginning of the year.”Trainer Eddie Truman, who turns 69 on Jan. 23, was excited to see Jacobson back at The Great Race Place.“I’ve known David for 40 years,” Truman said. “We both worked for Bobby way back when. David’s a good guy. I knew his dad in Florida, even rode for him in the 60s at Hialeah when he was stabled real close to our barn.“At Santa Anita after the races, I would play volley ball with David’s brother, Douglas, who works for him now.“Like most of us, I’ve got many memories of Frankel. I respected him so much. He was a genius. He knew his horses and we really worked well together. He was really good to me; he respected my opinion.“But I’d wonder why he did some of the things he did and ask myself, ‘Why’s he doing that?’ but it worked. He just knew what to do.” FOUR DECADES LATER, JACOBSON’S AT SANTA ANITARATTATAPTAP READY FOR GRADE I LA BREA STAKESOM OK OUTSIDE IN GRADE II MATHIS BROTHERS MILETRAINER HOPES IT’S MILLER TIME IN DAYTONA STAKESMANDELLA ENTERS TWO FOR SUNDAY’S FRANKELLIVE RACING AT SANTA ANITA WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30WALL CALENDAR AND MORE FREE ON OPENING DAY MILLER HAS TWO FOR THE MONEY IN DAYTONAPeter Miller entered two horses in Saturday’s Grade III Daytona Stakes scheduled for about 6 ½ furlongs on turf, Big Cazanova and Richard’s Boy.Big Cazanova has been routing and has never run down the hill. Richard’s Boy has been sprinting and is one-for-one on Santa’s unique downhill course.“We thought we’d give it a shot,” Miller said in explaining Big Cazanova’s participation. “A lot of the milers run really good down the hill, and he’s doing very well. The post (two) isn’t very good, but the horse is doing very well, so we’re going to give it a go.“Richard’s Boy fires every time I run him. He’s just a rock-solid horse.”As for an overview of the meet, Miller always looms a threat to win the training title, or at least be a major presence.“We feel good about it,” Miller said. “We’ve got a lot of live horses. Hopefully, we can carry on from 2015.”Big Cazanova worked three furlongs on a muddy main track Wednesday in 36.60 with Flavien Prat aboard, while Richard’s Boy went the same distance in 37.80.The field for the Daytona: Richard’s Boy, Victor Espinoza, 6-1; Big Cazanova, Joel Rosario, 8-1; Mystery Train, Martin Pedroza, 30-1; Rocket Heat, Edwin Maldonado, 12-1; Big Bane Theory, Flavien Prat, 12-1; Alert Bay, Martin Garcia, 5-1; Bench Warrant, Abel Lezcano, 20-1; Holy Lute, Santiago Gonzalez, 9-2; The Great War, Kent Desormeaux, 8-1; Somethings Unusual, Drayden Van Dyke, 20-1; No Silent, Gary Stevens, 7-2; Toowindytohaulrox, Tiago Pereira, 12-1; and Coastline, Tyler Baze, 20-1. LA BREA TIMING GOOD FOR RATTATAPTAPTrainer Phil D’Amato, who finished with a flourish at the recent Los Alamitos meet, hopes to continue on a roll when he sends out Rattataptap in the Grade I La Brea Stakes for three-year-old fillies at seven furlongs, one of four graded stakes on opening day, including the Malibu for three-year-olds at seven furlongs.“She’s doing well,” D’Amato said of the gray daughter of top sire Tapit, winner of a one-mile allowance race at Del Mar Nov. 21 by 4 ½ lengths. “The timing is right for the La Brea.“We’re backing up from two turns to one. Hopefully we can get the money in a Grade I.”The La Brea: Birdatthewire, Mike Smith, 6-1; Hot City Girl, Jose Ortiz, 3-1; Cavorting, Irad Ortiz Jr., 5-2; Maybellene, Rafael Bejarano, 15-1; Lily Pod, Mario Gutierrez, 20-1; Ben’s Duchess, Joe Talamo, 3-1; Rattataptap, Tyler Baze, 12-1; Pleasant Tales, James Graham, 20-1; Moyo Honey, Drayden Van Dyke, 20-1; and Finest City, Gary Stevens, 8-1.First post time opening day is 12 noon. Admission gates open at 10 a.m.OUTSIDE POST NO CONCERN FOR OM IN MATHIS MILE            Del Mar Derby and Twilight Derby winner Om drew post position 10 in a field of 12 for Saturday’s Grade II Mathis Brothers Mile on turf but trainer Dan Hendricks was not unduly concerned about the outside post.            “He’ll be able to break right on out and he’s got a long run to the first turn,” Hendricks reasoned. “He’ll get a good position, either be first or second, and hopefully run a big race.“If they go silly-fast, he’ll just sit right behind them. If they set a moderate pace, he’ll be in front; pretty simple.”Owned by the Sareen Family Trust, the chestnut son of Munnings has been a gem of consistency, with a 4-1-2 record from nine starts with earnings of $430,500.The field: Ground Rules, Rafael Bejarano, 12-1; Perfectly Majestic, Kent Desormeaux, 12-1; Crittenden, Martin Garcia, 12-1; Professor Berns, Brice Blanc, 15-1; Soul Driver, Tyler Baze, 8-1; Mister Brightside, Mike Smith, 4-1; Acceptance, Alonso Quinonez, 12-1; Ike Walker, Victor Espinoza, 20-1; Vigilante, Joe Talamo, 6-1; Om, Gary Stevens, 5-2; Ocho Ocho Ocho, Santiago Gonzalez, 10-1; and Fueled by Bourbon, Joel Rosario, 10-1.center_img MANDELLA PLANS ONE-TWO PUNCH IN FRANKELRichard Mandella has two horses entered in Sunday’s Grade III, $100,000 Robert J. Frankel Stakes for fillies and mares, three and up, at 1 1/8 miles on turf, and seems covered whether the race stays on grass or comes off due to recent rains.“Alexis Tangier is a nice mare; she would run only if it stays on turf,” Mandella said. “If it happens to come off the turf, Gas Total will run anyway. She’s a pretty good mare on either surface. It would probably be to her advantage if it did come off.”Alexis Tangier won the restricted Swingtime Stakes at a mile on grass Oct. 3 at Santa Anita. Eight of her 11 lifetime races have been on turf. Gas Total was 10th and last by 33 lengths in a one-mile dirt race at Del Mar Sept. 2, but won the restricted Osunitas Stakes on a “good” dirt track at the seaside course on July 18. She was second in the Possibly Perfect on turf at Santa Anita last June and second in the Grade I Vanity here in May.The Frankel: Nancy From Nairobi, Drayden Van Dyke; Three Hearts, Joe Talamo; Alexis Tangier, Gary Stevens; Rusty Slipper, James Graham; Star Act, Kieren Fallon; Peace and War, Joel Rosario; Stormy Lucy, Kent Desormeaux; Fresh Feline, Victor Espinoza; Warren’s Veneda, Tyler Baze; Sweet as a Rose, Brice Blanc; Gender Agenda, Rafael Bejarano; Glory, Mike Smith; Honey Ride, Abel Lezcano; Gas Total, Flavien Prat. LIVE RACING AT SANTA ANITA WEDNESDAY, DEC. 30Santa Anita will offer a five-day racing week beginning Wednesday, Dec. 30, through Sunday, Jan. 3. First post time throughout the week will be at 12:30 p.m.Excluding weekday holidays, live racing usually is conducted Thursday through Sunday, but with the holiday season in full swing, an exception was made. Santa Anita will be dark on Monday, Dec. 28, and Tuesday, Dec. 29.LONGTIME TRACK EMPLOYEE STEVEN GUINEY KILLED IN ACCIDENTLongtime backside employee Steven Guiney, son of former jockey and trainer Irv Guiney, was killed early Tuesday morning while riding his bicycle to work in Austin, Texas, according to his mother, Francis.Steven, 55, was employed by the late Willard Proctor as a groom and hot walker for nearly 20 years and worked a total of 30 years in Southern California for other trainers such as Tom Proctor, Howard Zucker and Gary Mandella.Guiney is survived by his parents, a sister, Cindy, and brothers, Michael and Irvin, Jr.Funeral services will be private.FINISH LINES: Santa Anita will give away its popular full color Wall Calendar free on opening day to all fans at the track with paid admission while supplies last. The theme of the artfully crafted 2016 calendar is “What’s in a name,” describing how some Thoroughbreds come by their peculiar monikers . . . The first 20,000 paid attendees will receive a $100 Mathis Brothers Furniture gift certificate, and the first 5,000 kids 17 and under accompanied by a paid adult will get a plush, mini-Thoroughbred toy, courtesy of the Mathis Brothers . . . Santa Anita will offer an opening day Trackside Package that includes special trackside seating, a free first drink, and an officially licensed American Pharoah T-shirt commemorating the first-ever Grand Slam champion of horse racing. Use promo code PHAROAH for $5 off the package price . . . There will be a $1 million guaranteed pool on the Late Pick 4 opening day, and a $150,000 guaranteed pool on the Pick 6. Each Thursday, Friday and on holiday Mondays, there will be $300,000 guaranteed in the Late Pick 4, and Saturdays and Sundays, it will jump up to $500,000, while the Pick 6 guarantee will remain at $150,000 . . . Belvoir Bay, an English-bred filly formerly trained by Bill Mott, worked five furlongs Wednesday on a muddy main track in 1:04 for Sunday’s $75,000 Blue Northern Stakes scheduled for one mile on turf. Flavien Prat was aboard for new trainer Peter Miller . . . Harlington’s Rose, who won the Kalookan Queen Stakes last year, will be back to defend her title in the $75,000 race at 6 ½ furlongs Dec. 30, trainer Steve Knapp said. Joe Talamo, who was aboard for the Kalookan Queen win in 2014, again rides the bay daughter of Harlington. Talamo also won the Grade III Las Flores Stakes on Harlington’s Rose in March of this year . . . The Elite Racing Network, with former jockey Corey Black an on-air host, is up and running. For further information, visit www.eliteracingnetwork.com.last_img read more

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