Tag: 上海千花 女生自荐

Beer Blog: Getting Rauch With Starr Hill Smoke Out

first_imgYou gotta respect a beer that makes you want to eat a cow. Okay, if you’re a vegetarian, you may not respect that beer, but for the rest of us, it’s pretty impressive. I recently had the chance to try Starr Hill Smoke Out, a German-style smoke beer that comes off malty and sweet with a strong smoke flavor. You also get a big hit of bacon in there. Put it all together and Smoke Out is a hardy, rich experience of a beer, which is exactly what you want from a Rauchbier (“rauch” is German for “smoke”). Smoked beers aren’t for everyone, and they’re not for every occasion.I wouldn’t go so far as to put Smoke Out in the novelty beer category (you know, those inexplicably strange beers that employ habanero peppers, chocolate, and the wood chips collected from National Park campfire rings), but I have a hard time imagining putting six of these back in a single sitting. Actually, I can’t imagine having more than one. But that’s okay, the Smoke Out isn’t a session beer. It’s a complex beer that’s meant to be enjoyed sparingly. You pop the top of a Smoke Out and pair it with a cheeseburger, for example, and you’ve got a match made in heaven.Fullsteam Brewing, out of North Carolina, makes something similar with their Hogwash!, a hickory-smoked porter that’s brewed specifically to be consumed while eating barbecue.You gotta respect a beer that’s made specifically for a certain kind of food. If that’s not the hallmark of a thoughtful artisan, then I don’t know what is. And I love Starr Hill’s Smoke Out because it pulls on those primal, cow-eating strings so effectively. I don’t typically dig on the burger, but a couple of sips into Smoke Out, and the cow craving was overwhelming.Smoke Out hit the stores in July as part of the brewery’s new “All Access” series of limited release beers. Find it in stores in 22 ounce bottles. Even though it’s part of the new series of beer, Smoke Out already has a storied history with a couple of Great American Beer Festival awards under its belt.Vegetarians beware.Follow Graham Averill’s adventures in drinking and Dad-hood at daddy-drinks.comlast_img read more

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Kick off charitable season with Giving Tuesday

first_imgNationwide—Giving Tuesday is a global day of giving that kicks off the charitable giving season. Coming just after Black Friday and Cyber Monday, it was created in part as a response to the commercialism and consumerism of those days. It was started in 2012  and a diverse group of individuals and organizations—nonprofit, civic, business, and corporate—celebrate by donating and giving their time, talents, and resources. Thousands of organizations now participate in the day worldwide, in almost 100 countries.Giving Tuesday is being observed today! It has been observed the Tuesday after Thanksgiving since 2012. If you would like to make a donation today but are unsure where to start.  A suggestion would be your local Community Foundation, whether it be Decatur, Franklin, or Ripley County.last_img read more

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Nancy Pelosi visits USC, talks political gridlock

first_imgU.S. House of Representatives Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi spoke to nearly 200 USC students, faculty and guests Monday morning, discussing her rise to political office and the feasibility of bipartisanship in a Republican-dominated Congress.The event was a part of the political science department’s Political Conversations series, a string of discussions that seeks to engage contemporary political leaders on trending issues from Washington. Pelosi has been the most prolific guest to date.“Thank you so much for the invitation to be here,” Pelosi said during the event’s opening. “USC is a beacon of light in the world of education and research.”Warschaw Chair in Practical Politics Robert Shrum, a longtime friend of the congresswoman, hosted the conversation. Pelosi, who affectionately referred to Shrum as “Shrummy” throughout the event, spoke candidly on her initial hesitations regarding entering political leadership when she was a member of the Democratic National Committee in the 1980s.“We [all] have to take responsibility for the direction of our country,” Pelosi said. “[But] I had absolutely no intention of running for office … I was more behind-the-scenes.”The aversion to campaigning, however, did not last long. Pelosi would go on to be elected as the representative of California’s 5th Congressional District in 1987 (now she represents the 12th) and later as the first woman speaker of the House from 2007 to 2011. She described her political escalation as “going from housewife to House speaker” and from “kitchen to Congress.”The discussion quickly shifted to the current political landscape, where Pelosi currently serves as the House Democratic leader and the Republicans hold the majority in both the House and the Senate.The topic revolved heavily around the possibility of bipartisanship, and Pelosi described her stance as hopeful, but was critical of the opposing party’s current behavior. She described the Republican Congress as being more concerned with “obstructing” rather than “legislating,” and described its nature as “anti-governance.”Pelosi stressed, however, that there is recent precedence for the two parties to work together in some capacity, something she witnessed when the Democratic Party held a majority in both houses under President George W. Bush from 2006 to 2008.“For two years, we worked with President Bush and got a great deal,” Pelosi said, specifically mentioning the raising of emission standards and amendments to the Voting Rights Act, among other pieces of legislation.Not unconscious of her audience, the congresswoman also stressed the need for proper education funding, speaking disparagingly of Republican-recommended cuts.“[Cutting education] is one of the dumbest things you could do,” Pelosi said, citing a Republican desire for reductions in Pell grants (need-based money for undergraduate education) to lower the national deficit. “Nothing brings more money to the treasury than the education of the American people.”Pelosi’s frustration with the Republican Party was evident during the discussion, and the conversation wasn’t without subtle jabs at the GOP. She described the Republicans in Congress as being anti-governance, anti-science and anti-Barack Obama.“They have a trifecta of justification for shutting down government [and] not lifting the debt ceiling,” she said. “That’s what we’re contending with.”Shrum, who was a Democratic political consultant before coming to USC, was also not without choice words for the opposing party.“There is a visceral hate of Barack Obama and a belief in the Republican Party that he is not a legitimate president,” he said. Pelosi advised those in the audience who were members of the GOP to change their party from within.In the second portion of the discussion, Pelosi took questions from the students and faculty in the audience. A student questioned the congresswoman on whether Congress’ current state of gridlock is a modern phenomenon or indicative of age-old political tensions.“There’s always been a healthy difference of opinion … [but] I have never seen it this bad,” Pelosi said.She elaborated that today’s Congress is worse than the political divide that existed in the 1990s, or what she referred to as the politics of “personal destruction,” during which the Republican-led House in 1998 impeached former President Bill Clinton.In an interview with the Daily Trojan following the event, Pelosi discussed matters pertinent to students at USC, such as the escalating cost of college and how her party’s focus is on eliminating hindrances to the access of federal aid money.“We have to recognize that the United States has to invest in our future by investing in our young people and your education,” she said. “From my experience now, most young people don’t really care about [political] parties so much, and that’s okay, as long as we have shared values we’re fighting for.”The congresswoman concluded by reflecting on the desire for increased participation among college-aged students in the political area, and that the turnout at Monday’s event was indicative of a demographic willing to get involved.“The fact that this many people showed up for a discussion of the political stuff and how to be involved and how to be effective, it gave me hope and I hope it gave them hope.”last_img read more

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IPL planning return in empty stadiums

first_imgImage Courtesy: Twitter/TOIAdvertisement fzhNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs6si0Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E8nm6pf( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 8zskgWould you ever consider trying this?😱zcy8rnCan your students do this? 🌚x0c7dRoller skating! Powered by Firework After three months of suspension amidst the novel Coronavirus pandemic, world sports has finally seeing their return to action, albeit slowly. Regarding cricket, India has scheduled their tour of Australia coming December. However, global fans of the sport were eager on the outcome of the multiple cancellations that IPL 2020 had to face, and now, BCCI has confirmed that the cash rich cricket tournament is planning to have a behind closed doors return!Advertisement Image Courtesy: Twitter/TOIThe 13th season of Indian Premier League was scheduled to begin on 29th March, but the COVID-19 crisis pushed back the date at first to 15th April, and after the lock down extension in the country, the tournament faced suspension again, without confirming a possible return date.However, BCCI president Sourav Ganguly has shed some light on the future of the tournament, stating that a behind closed door tournament is likely a possible option later this year.Advertisement “The BCCI is working on all possible options to ensure that we are able to stage the IPL this year, even if it means playing the tournament in empty stadiums. The fans, franchisees, players, broadcasters, sponsors and all other stakeholders are keenly looking forward to the possibility of IPL being hosted this year,” Ganguly’s letter to the state associations read, as quoted by Times of India.IPL, which observes a huge fan following all over the world, has a lofty number of foreign players and stakeholders, as Ganguly’s letter further stated: “Recently a lot of players, both from India and other countries, participating in IPL have also shown their keenness on being a part of this year IPL.”Advertisement “We are optimistic and the BCCI will shortly decide on the future course of action on this,” Dada added.On the other hand, ICC has the Men’s T20 World Cup in the current year’s schedule, but is yet to confirm the dates of the tournament. While possibility of a clash with the upcoming IPL’s schedule can not be ruled out, Brijesh Patel, the tournament’s governing council chairman, has stated that hosting the tournament in the September-October window is the current target.“We are ready to go ahead with the IPL. But we can start planning the schedule formally only after the official announcement is made on the T20 World Cup, which I’m expecting will arrive anytime soon. On our part, we’ve already earmarked the September-October window for the tournament to be played.” Patel said in an interview with TOI.If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.com Also follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.comAlso read-Shikhar Dhawan: “We will win the IPL and bring the trophy home.”A wild swerve: Misled fans accuse Darren Sammy wrongly of being racist towards himself Advertisementlast_img read more

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Monmouth Park Kicks Off Season

first_imgNew This Year: Exchange WageringBy John BurtonOCEANPORT – Operators of Monmouth Park have some plans for the coming season and big hopes that voters will endorse gaming outside of Atlantic City.This 2016 season, starting on Saturday, May 14, is the thoroughbred horseracing track’s 71st year. It will mark the introduction of a new, additional way to place bets. Also, track proponents are keeping their fingers crossed that voters on Nov. 8 will endorse a referendum that would allow for gaming and establishing two casinos outside of Atlantic City.Attorney Dennis Drazin, who represents New Jersey Thoroughbred Horseman’s Association, and is an advisor to Darby Development, LLC, the entities that operate Monmouth Park, told the audience at a press conference and luncheon on Tuesday that the referendum would mean an additional revenue stream for locations like this one in Oceanport. “So, it’s important for Monmouth Park that the referendum passes.”Monmouth Park has been waging what, up until now, has been an unsuccessful legal battle in federal court to win gambling, including sports betting, at tracks. Such groups as the NFL and the NBA have been blocking New Jersey’s efforts. Drazin and other Monmouth Park supporters have continued to stress that revenue stream was imperative to keeping the track vital. They added the money would help allow track operators to move forward with site improvements—such as restaurants, a concert amphitheater and boardwalk-style attractions—to have Monmouth Park grow as a family-friendly destination.“We’re trying to do everything we can to enhance the experience,” Drazin said.Dennis Drazin, advisor to the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemens Association and Darby Development, the operator of Monmouth Park, left, with State Senator Jennifer Beck and Kip Levin, CEO of Betfair US discuss the introduction of exchange wagering in New Jersey. Photo By Bill Denver/EQUI-PHOTO.Should voters approve it, the referendum would permit casinos that are at lease 72 miles away from Atlantic City. Monmouth Park would not be a location. However, Drazin said, at this point, the referendum and the accompanying legislation would designate 2 percent of revenue generated to be allocated to support the state’s horse breeding industry and racing.State Senator Jennifer Beck (R-11), offered her support for the referendum, racing and horse breeding—long a vital staple of the state and Monmouth County economies but now a challenging one.Beck, who called horseracing “a personal passion,” noted 14 Monmouth County horse farms have closed. Another seven are likely to follow suit, resulting in the loss of those businesses and jobs, as well as the loss of 776 acres of open space.Beck and other legislators were concerned over the meager 2 percent that would be earmarked. But Beck said in her conversations with state Senate President Steve Sweeney that amount would be the “minimum” and additional funds would eventually make its way into this industry.“It’s incredibly important to Monmouth Park and incredibly important to the residents of New Jersey,” that the referendum passes, Beck said.Hall Of Fame jockey Jorge Velasquez and thoroughbred owner Richard Malouf, right, at the Monmouth Park Opening Day press conference and luncheon at Monmouth Park Racetrack. Photo By Bill Denver/EQUI-PHOTO.This year Monmouth Park is partnering with Betfair, a British company, to establish Internet-based exchange wagering. New Jersey is the first state in the country to move forward with this, Drazin said, with California getting ready to implement it.Internet exchange betting is popular around the world and is a fixed-odds, peer-to-peer form of wagering. It would also allow individuals to place bets even while the race is underway, Drazin explained. Up to this point, betting on individual races stopped once the horses began running.“We’re hoping this,” Drazin said of this new type of gaming, “will draw people who want to see it live,” referring to the racing.This type of gaming would likely attract younger, tech-savvy fans, Drazin said.Betfair this year will be the titled sponsor of the $1 million Haskell Invitational race in August. Last year’s Haskell drew Triple Crown winner American Pharoah, and record-breaking crowds of an estimated 65,000 attendees to the racetrack.The track shortly will have the opening of a new dining option, consisting of three levels, from the most casual to the high end, Drazin added.“We continue to persevere,” he maintained.“The track did well,” last year, Drazin said. It arrived at a breakeven point, financially, with strong crowds and larger prizes offered to race winners. This year, however, the track decided to reduce the race purses, other than the named events. The reason, he explained, is that track operators, who have been running things for five years, now face paying the previously deferred loan obligations, as well as needing to make additional repairs and upgrades on the facility.Monmouth Park is Oceanport’s largest taxpayer and a significant area employer.last_img read more

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Sea Bright Borough Tackles Affordable Housing

first_imgAt the Feb. 5 meeting of the Borough Council, the governing body established a mandatory set-aside for future residential development projects in Sea Bright.Photo by Chris Rotolo The governing body mandated that all new multi-family residential developments of five or more units will be required to provide an affordable housing set-aside as follows: Establishing an affordable housing plan will also protect the borough from builder’s remedy lawsuits. Towns that do not have court-approved affordable housing plans are susceptible to lawsuits from developers who can propose affordable housing developments in any section of a municipality. Establishing an affordable housing plan can allow the borough to dictate affordable housing zoning overlays in the town. The proposed project on the Gaiters site was delayed by Super Storm Sandy, which made landfall in October 2012. Work has yet to begin on the proposed project. Councilman Charles H. Rooney said developers have obtained all necessary approvals. The development fees can be attached to non-residential development projects and used to complement federal, state and local monies to increase and maintain the borough’s supply of safe and sanitary affordable housing units. A second ordinance was also passed to establish affordable housing development fees in the borough. The ordinance allows municipalities under the jurisdiction of the Council on Affordable Housing (COAH), with a court-approved affordable housing spending plan, to organize an affordable housing trust fund. At Tuesday night’s meeting, the Sea Bright Borough Council passed an ordinance to amend and supplement Sea Bright’s land use code to establish regulations and a mandatory affordable housing set-aside in connection with future residential development projects in the borough. The totals put the borough’s unmet need at 60 affordable units. According to data published in 2015 by the Fair Share Housing Center, in the previous round (1987 to 1999) Sea Bright’s initial obligation was set at 37 affordable units. The borough’s capped present need is 11 units, and its capped prospective need is 12 units. • A minimum of 15 percent of the number of for-rent units proposed in a development application must be affordable units.center_img • A minimum of 20 percent of the number of for-sale housing units proposed in a development application must be designated as affordable units. Mark A. Leckstein, borough council president, and Mayor Dina Long said establishing these ordinances will allow Sea Bright to start formulating a suitable affordable housing plan. A previous builder’s remedy lawsuit levied against the borough was settled in March 2011, when municipal officials reached an agreement with the owner of Gaiters, a former restaurant at the foot of the Route 36 Highlands Bridge. The borough council memorialized an ordinance to create a new affordable housing zone on the site. These proposed affordable units can be offered on-site or off-site as long as they are provided within the borough. These newly established guidelines will impact all future developments in Sea Bright, including a proposed multimillion dollar riverfront housing project that was introduced this past December at a special meeting. That project proposes 44 new housing units, including a 20 percent affordable housing set-aside, and could bring with it more than 40,000 square feet of public green space on the bank of the Shrewsbury River. “It’s mandated by the state. We have to do this,” Leckstein said. “We don’t have a plan at this time, but now we can move forward with planning to fulfill our obligation.” SEA BRIGHT – The governing body is planning to meet the state-mandated affordable housing obligation within the borough. New Jersey is currently in its third round of Fair Share Housing Obligation, a cycle that began in 1999 and is due to end in 2025, when fourth round guidelines and obligations will be established.last_img read more

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