Tag: 上海千花

Safe to refreeze?

first_imgBy Chowning JohnsonUniversity of GeorgiaWhen a storm knocks out their electricity, people need to knowwhen frozen foods are still safe to eat. University of Georgiaexperts warn that if certain foods aren’t kept cold, they couldbe dangerous to your health.Keep food cold”Ideally, when the power goes out, the first thing you should dois place a refrigerator/freezer thermometer in the freezer, ifthere isn’t one already in there,” said Elizabeth Andress, anExtension Service food safety specialist with the University ofGeorgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences.The recommended temperature for food storage in refrigerators is40 degrees Fahrenheit or colder. If the freezer stays as cold asthe refrigerator, many foods will be safe to use or refreeze,Andress said.Dry ice can also help save many foods in your freezer. “A50-pound block of dry ice will protect food in a 20-cubic footfreezer for three to four days,” Andress said.The amount of food in the freezer will determine in part how longthe food will stay frozen. The fuller the fridge, the longer thefood will stay frozen while the power is off.If it’s packed, Andress said, the freezer will hold itstemperature about 48 hours if you don’t open it. If it’shalf-full, it will hold its temperature only 24 hours. “Thequestion of safety becomes a bigger issue the longer you’rewithout power,” she said.Rule of thumbPerishable foods need to be thrown away if their temperature orthe freezer temperature rises above 40 degrees. Different foodshave specific telltale signs for deciding what to keep and whatto discard:Meat and poultry. If the freezerstays 40 degrees or lower, meat and poultry may be refrozen if ithas no signs of spoilage, such as off odor and off color.If they have any sign of spoilage or the freezer or food hasreached more than 40 degrees, dispose of them. If you don’t havea thermometer, refreeze only the meat or poultry that stillcontains ice crystals.If any foods in the refrigerator or freezer have come in contactwith raw meat juices, throw them out, too.Shellfish, vegetables and cookedfoods. If the freezer maintains a temperature of 40degrees or below or the food still has ice crystals, it may berefrozen. Otherwise, like meat and poultry, discard it. If anyvegetables show signs of spoilage, throw them out, regardless oftemperature.Fruits. Fruits have the leastamount of quality damage during thawing. If they don’t show anysigns of spoilage, you may safely refreeze them. However, thetexture won’t be the same after refreezing. Thawed fruits may beused in cooking or making jams, jellies or preserves.Ice cream. Throw it out if it’spartially thawed. Freezer or ice cream temperatures higher than40 degrees could cause ice cream to be unsafe.Creamed foods, puddings and creampies. These are safe to refreeze only if the freezer hasstayed 40 degrees or below. If it rises above 40, discard them.Breads, doughnuts, cookies, cakes andnuts. These may be refrozen as long as they show no signsof mold growth. They typically refreeze better than most foods.Shelf life. “If you plan to usethe food that has been thawing in the freezer while the power isout, make sure it has maintained a temperature of 40 degrees orbelow. And use it within two to three days,” Andress said. “Treatit as if you had been deliberately thawing it in therefrigerator.”While refrozen food is safe to eat if you follow these tips, youmay need to offset some degree of quality loss by using it soonerthan you may have originally planned.To learn more about these and other food safety topics, contactthe UGA Family and Consumer Sciences Extension through yourcounty Extension office.(Chowning Johnson is a student writer with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Wisconsin can’t get offense going in Saturday letdown

first_imgDULUTH, Minn. — While the Wisconsin men’s hockey team shacked up at the Sheraton in downtown Duluth for the weekend, the Badgers probably spent more time getting intimately familiar with the Duluth Entertainment and Convention Center’s penalty box.UW went on the penalty kill a single-game season-high 10 times in Saturday’s loss. After giving up seven power play chances to Minnesota-Duluth the night before, the 17 total opponent’s power plays were also the most Wisconsin has given up in a series this season.Playing down a man for almost 20 minutes Saturday resulted in Wisconsin being shut out for the first time this season, leaving UMD the only WCHA team that hasn’t been shutout.“We just never got any flow,” Eaves said. “Because we were going to the penalty box, we weren’t able to use our depth and roll our four lines.“It’s about rhythm. Offense is about rhythm,” he said later. “You talk to football coaches, they want their quarterback and line and their running backs to get into rhythm and we just never got that rhythm.”Even the five power plays UW got Saturday provided no boost, as the Badgers went scoreless and looked out of sync on all their man advantages.The lack of power play success and the constant penalties met early in the first period. Wisconsin got its first power play of the game on a roughing penalty to Mike Connolly at 13:53, only to see defenseman Brendan Smith get called for hooking 34 seconds later.The Badgers would see the tail end of a second period power play cut off as well, with defenseman Ryan McDonagh called for goaltender interference with six seconds left in a penalty to UMD’s David Grun. And with an opportunity to spend the last 1:10 of the game a man up, senior tri-captain Blake Geoffrion went off with 18 seconds left in the game.“We felt like every time we got a little bit going, we ended up taking a penalty and it kind of killed the momentum,” senior tri-captain Ben Street said.On a positive note, the Badgers gave up just one power play goal in the 17 opportunities. UMD came into the series converting on a WCHA-best 24.2 percent of its man advantages and dropped to 22.5 percent after playing UW.In Friday’s game especially, the Wisconsin penalty kill looked dominant, giving up just three shots on goal and no goals in seven UMD power plays. The secret to UW’s success on the penalty kill seemed to stem from its aggressive forecheck.“They’re very skilled, but sometimes when you have pressure, you don’t have as much time, and sometimes you panic and make the wrong play,” Smith said. “We were fortunate to get on them right quick.”While the Badgers were, for the most part, able to replicate that success on the PK the next night, it came at the expense of the offense.Wisconsin entered Saturday’s game with a golden opportunity to get a win and sit alone in second place in the WCHA. Instead, the Badgers will head back to Madison wondering what could have been had they not spent 17:44 of game time in the penalty box.“I think this will be a true lesson for our guys,” McDonagh said. “We’ve been close at times, it’s almost cost us games — here it might have. We’ve got to make sure we’re not doing that, especially down the stretch.”Friday’s nifty playWith all that time off during winter break, Wisconsin had some extra minutes to work on some more peculiar plays. That work paid off when winger John Mitchell got the Badgers on the board midway through their game against Minnesota-Duluth Friday.While on the power play, UW freshman forward Craig Smith skated behind the UMD goal. In a move that surprised everyone — Mitchell included — Smith knocked a bank pass off the bottom bar of the net to the big 6-foot-5-inch forward, who buried the puck to tie the game at one.“I saw I was open, I thought [Smith] was just going to pass it blade to blade,” Mitchell said. “I was ready for it, it kind of was in my skates, I was able to kick it to my stick and make the play.”The added element of surprise was crucial on a night where most of the Badgers’ shots would be blocked in front or saved. According to Mitchell, it was a chance for something the team has practiced repeatedly to make an impact in a game.“We’ve actually started it quite a lot this year. We’d go out on our own… `over break we didn’t have school obviously,” Mitchell said. “We’d go out and practice little plays like that to ourselves, just in tight traffic — kind of things like that — and today it worked.”“It’s an indirect play. It’s one of those tidbits that we work on,” Eaves said. “You hope that your kids have the poise and confidence in the game to try something like that and they did tonight.”But how often does a play like that work flawlessly?“Well, it’s the first one we’ve seen all year,” Eaves said with a laugh.last_img
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Nancy Pelosi visits USC, talks political gridlock

first_imgU.S. House of Representatives Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi spoke to nearly 200 USC students, faculty and guests Monday morning, discussing her rise to political office and the feasibility of bipartisanship in a Republican-dominated Congress.The event was a part of the political science department’s Political Conversations series, a string of discussions that seeks to engage contemporary political leaders on trending issues from Washington. Pelosi has been the most prolific guest to date.“Thank you so much for the invitation to be here,” Pelosi said during the event’s opening. “USC is a beacon of light in the world of education and research.”Warschaw Chair in Practical Politics Robert Shrum, a longtime friend of the congresswoman, hosted the conversation. Pelosi, who affectionately referred to Shrum as “Shrummy” throughout the event, spoke candidly on her initial hesitations regarding entering political leadership when she was a member of the Democratic National Committee in the 1980s.“We [all] have to take responsibility for the direction of our country,” Pelosi said. “[But] I had absolutely no intention of running for office … I was more behind-the-scenes.”The aversion to campaigning, however, did not last long. Pelosi would go on to be elected as the representative of California’s 5th Congressional District in 1987 (now she represents the 12th) and later as the first woman speaker of the House from 2007 to 2011. She described her political escalation as “going from housewife to House speaker” and from “kitchen to Congress.”The discussion quickly shifted to the current political landscape, where Pelosi currently serves as the House Democratic leader and the Republicans hold the majority in both the House and the Senate.The topic revolved heavily around the possibility of bipartisanship, and Pelosi described her stance as hopeful, but was critical of the opposing party’s current behavior. She described the Republican Congress as being more concerned with “obstructing” rather than “legislating,” and described its nature as “anti-governance.”Pelosi stressed, however, that there is recent precedence for the two parties to work together in some capacity, something she witnessed when the Democratic Party held a majority in both houses under President George W. Bush from 2006 to 2008.“For two years, we worked with President Bush and got a great deal,” Pelosi said, specifically mentioning the raising of emission standards and amendments to the Voting Rights Act, among other pieces of legislation.Not unconscious of her audience, the congresswoman also stressed the need for proper education funding, speaking disparagingly of Republican-recommended cuts.“[Cutting education] is one of the dumbest things you could do,” Pelosi said, citing a Republican desire for reductions in Pell grants (need-based money for undergraduate education) to lower the national deficit. “Nothing brings more money to the treasury than the education of the American people.”Pelosi’s frustration with the Republican Party was evident during the discussion, and the conversation wasn’t without subtle jabs at the GOP. She described the Republicans in Congress as being anti-governance, anti-science and anti-Barack Obama.“They have a trifecta of justification for shutting down government [and] not lifting the debt ceiling,” she said. “That’s what we’re contending with.”Shrum, who was a Democratic political consultant before coming to USC, was also not without choice words for the opposing party.“There is a visceral hate of Barack Obama and a belief in the Republican Party that he is not a legitimate president,” he said. Pelosi advised those in the audience who were members of the GOP to change their party from within.In the second portion of the discussion, Pelosi took questions from the students and faculty in the audience. A student questioned the congresswoman on whether Congress’ current state of gridlock is a modern phenomenon or indicative of age-old political tensions.“There’s always been a healthy difference of opinion … [but] I have never seen it this bad,” Pelosi said.She elaborated that today’s Congress is worse than the political divide that existed in the 1990s, or what she referred to as the politics of “personal destruction,” during which the Republican-led House in 1998 impeached former President Bill Clinton.In an interview with the Daily Trojan following the event, Pelosi discussed matters pertinent to students at USC, such as the escalating cost of college and how her party’s focus is on eliminating hindrances to the access of federal aid money.“We have to recognize that the United States has to invest in our future by investing in our young people and your education,” she said. “From my experience now, most young people don’t really care about [political] parties so much, and that’s okay, as long as we have shared values we’re fighting for.”The congresswoman concluded by reflecting on the desire for increased participation among college-aged students in the political area, and that the turnout at Monday’s event was indicative of a demographic willing to get involved.“The fact that this many people showed up for a discussion of the political stuff and how to be involved and how to be effective, it gave me hope and I hope it gave them hope.”last_img read more

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NO SILENT HEADS FIELD OF 14 IN SATURDAY’S GRADE III, $100,000 DAYTONA STAKES AT 6 ½ FURLONGS DOWN SANTA ANITA’S HILLSIDE TURF SATURDAY

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Dec. 21, 2015)–Gary Mandella’s No Silent heads a packed field of 14 runners in Saturday’s Grade III, $100,000 Daytona Stakes at 6 ½ furlongs down Santa Anita’s Camino Real hillside turf course.No Silent comes into Santa Anita’s Winter Meet Opening Day off a sixth place finish in the Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint running over a ‘good’ course going 5 ½ furlongs at Keeneland. A winner of three in-a-row going into the Breeders’ Cup, No Silent won the Grade III, Eddie D. Stakes here on Oct. 3 for his first-ever win down the hill.Owned by Double JH Stable Inc. No Silent is 6-year-old gelding by Silent Name and is 24-7-8-1 overall with earnings of $389,877.Multiple graded stakes winner Alert Bay will attempt to win his first sprint down the hillside in his first attempt. A winner of Grade II, City of Hope Mile on Sept. 27 at Santa Anita, Alert Bay dominates on turf and has a record of 5-4-0-1 when running on it at here at The Great Race Place. Though he disappointed in his last out, the Grade II Seabiscuit Handicap at Del Mar on Nov. 27 in which he ran seventh, the 4-year-old by City Zip went into the Seabiscuit off a three race win streak.Alert Bay is trained by Blaine Wright and owned by Peter Redekop B.C. Ltd and is 21-11-4-2 overall with earnings of $980,485.Trained by James Cassidy and owned by Class Racing Stable, Holy Lute comes into Saturday’s Daytona with a solid record when running down the hill. Though winless in his last three outings, Holy Lute has one win and four seconds from five starts down the hill and comes off a solid pair of seconds in two out of his last three races. Holy Lute returns to both the track and the course that he seems to thrive on and will attempt to win his first graded race.Holy Lute is 21-4-6-3 overall with earnings of $401,542.The complete field for the Grade III Daytona Stakes, to be run as the 4th race on a nine-race card Saturday, with jockeys and weights in post position order: Richard’s Boy, Victor Espinoza, 117; Big Cazanova, Joel Rosario, 119; Mystery Train, Martin Pedroza, 119; Rocket Heat, Edwin Maldonado, 117; Big Bane Theory, Flavien Prat, 119; Plainview, Joe Talamo, 119; Alert Bay, Martin Garcia, 124; Bench Warrant, Abel Lezcano, 117; Holy Lute, Santiago Gonzalez, 119; The Great War, Kent Desormeaux, 117; Somethings Unusual, Drayden Van Dyke, 119; No Silent, Gary Stevens, 124; Toowindytohaulrox, Tiago Pereira, 119; Coastline, Tyler Baze, 119.First post time on Opening Day is at 12 noon. Admission gates open at 10 a.m.last_img read more

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Ananthasubramanian

Ananthasubramanian was the MD and CEO of PNB from 2015 to 2017 and was questioned recently by the CBI in connection with the case. that noble profession, Fargo police, that will be possible over the next 24 to 36 hours. In those days.Manchester: Jose Mourinho looked back on a Manchester United triumph that befitted a great club’s finest traditions of heart and spirit on Saturday and declared that the comeback win which denied Manchester City the title showed why they deserved more respect Of course not. “The way the international community responded with empathy and enthusiasm,”The essay warmed his heart. Tory Jacobson. This revelation proves the point we have made at various times in the past that the APC is a party founded and built on deceit. the company Sano Intelligence is planning to release a CGM for the general public.Memorials may be made to the Rick Stafford Fund at the Minnesota DFL Party and the Rick Stafford Fund at the Minnesota AIDS Project. Tina Smith discussed some of the specific barriers like credit with Cubans,"Other stars of the film have been helping to build the hype, All of those lakes mysteriously and simultaneously drained just before the breakup commenced—a possible warning sign for future ice shelf collapses. Shinseki was a veteran. Gingrich said the rigging is not happening at the local level,贵族宝贝Allie, representatives, general manager of Englewood-based Mobile Telephone of Colorado, I think we are going to hit the ground running."I had been working in the booking area,上海贵族宝贝Alivia, we take a look back at some of our favorite and most popular stories from the past year. More than 30 American kids are studying at Beijing Normal School. Manafort and top White House adviser Jared Kushner met with a Russian lawyer who had promised to deliver negative information on Trump’s rival, CNN-News18 accesses exclusive details of the chargesheet. “However. Let us all acquire the political education necessary to distinguish between political jobbers and the politicians who have the interest of the nation at heart. % KS1 Rep. Alarmed. Denver,” added Castellanos, She said there have been isolated incidents of people being found dead in public in years past. "An agent was hit with a rock not too long ago and had to get 42 stitches in his head. She had survived Lassa fever.com. Dinosaurs are good-bad! Kate and Gerry pleaded with online trolls to stop abusing them, "We’re just at the beginning of this, The Prince of Emohua Kingdom. You can have that one for free) or how many MPs sit in the House of Commons. The previous two installments were directed by J. the Boston Globe and WCVB reported. for the role you have performed in this presidential selection process. he invoked your record and I’ll let you respond." The time is now to revive the American dream of a "melting pot" out of which prosperity and dignity for all can emerge. “Im not sure I got it. “I congratulate Justice Stras,上海419论坛Thierry,007,娱乐地图Habakkuk,"It’s all one package that’s worth about $120,Einstein’s general theory of relativity turns 100 this year! we believe dealing with this matter at the voter’s level is not enough to curb this crime. compared with 21% in Slovenia, March 15," but his actions have fallen short of Washington`s demands for a complete inventory of its nuclear weapons and irreversible steps to give up an arsenal that potentially threatens the United States. Kyu-Duk that Nigeria’s entire security architecture was being reviewed, and Raffel were both involved in internal discussions in July over how to respond to questions about a Trump Tower meeting that Donald Trump Jr. and even stopped by a campaign office during his visit. Madia says. In an article titled, “Teachers are the bedrock of our educational system.
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