Month: June 2021

Top 14’s latest ‘Revelation’, Rémi Lamerat

first_img It was a night of triumph for Toulon on Monday at the 11th edition of the ‘Nuit du Rugby’, the annual awards ceremony honouring French rugby’s standout performers. Matt Giteau was crowned Player of the Year for the 2013-14 season, Bernard Laporte, Pierre Mignoni and Jacques Delmas were named best coaches, and there was a special gong for Jonny Wilkinson – a sort of ‘Lifetime Achievement’ award.One of the few titles to elude Toulon was the ‘Revelation of the Season’, awarded to the up-and-coming French player in the Top 14 adjudged to have burst onto the scene in blistering fashion. That went to Castres’ 24-year-old centre Rémi Lamerat, a personable young man who lists Nelson Mandela as his hero, likes the music of Sting and has a deep interest in current affairs.Brought up in the village of Sainte-Foy la Grande in south-western France, Lamerat joined Toulouse as a teenager and then moved to Castres at the end of the 2010-11 season. It took him a couple of seasons to nail down a first-team spot but he started 23 of Castres’ 29 league matches last season, including the Top 14 final against Toulon. A week later Lamerat – more of a Bastareaud than a Fickou in style – made his debut off the bench for France against Australia. It wasn’t a match that will linger long in his memory. France were hammered 50-23, and Lamerat also had the misfortune to appear as a substitute in the two Tests that followed as the tourists slumped to a 3-0 series whitewash.It was a hell of an initiation into Test rugby but one that Lamerat seems to have passed; he was named last month in Philippe Saint-Andre’s 30-man squad for the November Tests against Australia, Argentina and Fiji so, who knows, he might yet experience a winning feeling in a French jersey.Feeling Bleu: Lamerat takes a charge against the WallabiesWhat Lamerat will be hoping as he finds space for his ‘Revelation of the Season’ trophy on the mantelpiece is that he doesn’t experience the same dip in fortunes as most of his predecessors. A poisoned chalice? That would be going too far but a scroll back through the list of former ‘Revelation’ leaves one wondering where it all went wrong for some.Yannick Nyanga was the first recipient in 2004. Then a 20-year-old at Beziers, the spring-heeled flanker made his Test debut that same year and for the next three years was a regular fixture in the France back-row. Then Marc Lievremont replaced Bernard Laporte as coach and Nyanga was dumped, cast out into the international wilderness for five years until recalled by Saint-Andre in 2012.Florian Fritz, the 2005 ‘Revelation’ was another who fell foul of Livremont’s wacky selection whims. First capped in 2005, the Toulouse centre made only four starts under Lievremont before being brought back into the fold by Saint-Andre. As for Lamerat, we’ll have to wait a few seasons to discover if the latest ‘Revelation’ blossoms into a sensation or if his career peters out in frustration.Read how Carl Hayman rates Toulon’s chances of a European hat-trick in the November issue of Rugby World – out now! Click here for all the latest deals, or find out how to download the digital edition here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Another talent has landed: Rémi Lamerat of Castres was awarded the Top 14 ‘Revelation of the Season’ Bordeaux fly-half Lionel Beauxis won the award in 2006, and the following year made 12 appearances for France. In the seven years since he’s collected just eight more caps, the last of them coming in the 2012 Six Nations.Stade Francais flanker Antoine Burban was the 2007 recipient but to date has failed to transfer his club form to the Test arena, winning just three caps from the bench. Maxime Medard won the award in 2008 and in the three years that followed threatened to become a world-class talent. But the Toulouse full-back-cum-wing has stalled in the last couple of seasons, a victim of the conservative coaching that runs through both his club and his national team.Needs a hand: Gael Fickou has impressed, but has been mishandledMarc Andreu, the 2010 winner (the category wasn’t awarded in 2009), was always going to find the transition from club to Test rugby a challenge. At 5ft 5in and 12 stone, the Racing Metro winger with seven caps to his name is unlikely to be seen again for France.Jean-Marc Doussain, the Toulouse scrum-half who won the award in 2011, might also struggle to add to his 10 caps given his problems in last season’s Six Nations, but not so the 2012 recipient Brice Dulin who is in fact the only ‘Revelation’ named in the squad for next month’s trio of Tests. The Racing Metro full-back was succeeded in 2013 by Toulouse centre Gael Fickou but his form has been patchy of late although few doubt that the 20-year-old will be back in blue before long.last_img read more

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Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgHair-raising: Joe Webber’s natty plaited rats tail makes an unwelcome appearance in DubaiTime for a scissors moveRegular readers of this column will know that I am not the biggest fan of bizarre haircuts, and checking in for his appointment at the Sinners’ Salon of Shame this week is New Zealand Sevens player Joe Webber. If you haven’t seen his own, unique take on the always comical rats tail, feast your eyes. The SinnersFrench farceWhat a shambles Montpellier looked as they slumped to a 30-5 home defeat to Bath on Friday evening. Having gone five games without a win, coach Fabien Galthie made 11 changes to his team but they leaked points and saw skipper Thibaut Privat sin-binned for wiping out Henry Thomas when the Bath prop was lifting at a lineout. Antoine Battut and Charles Geli were also yellow carded but their actions were not quite so brainless as Privat’s extremely dangerous play.Not even the groundsman at the Altrad Stadium could be proud of his day’s work, as the soccer pitch markings were still clearly visible, making it very tricky to even work out where the pitch was. Get your act together Montpellier! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Foolish FinnWith two wins from their first two Champions Cup games, Glasgow Warriors went to Toulouse in search of more points but came away empty handed, having had their cause damaged by a foolish tip-tackle from Finn Russell on his opposite number, Jean-Marc Doussain. It was a clear yellow card for referee John Lacey to wield in the 37th minute and the Warriors went from 3-3 at that stage to 16-3 down just five minutes later as Toulouse kicked a penalty and scored a try through Maxime Medard. The Scots never recovered and lost 19-11, with Duncan Weir missing a difficult conversion that would at least have brought a losing bonus point. The European competitions took centre stage this weekend, with the third round of Champions Cup and Challenge Cup pool matches bringing joy for some and pain for others. And out in the east we also had the Dubai Sevens. Target man: Owen Williams kicked 20 points for Leicester in their welcome win over Toulon Tips is the topJustin Tipuric turned on the after-burners and combined beautifully with Rhys Webb to create a magical try for Josh Matavesi as the Ospreys came from behind to draw 19-19 with Racing Metro. Hanno Dirksen trucked up around half-way, Webb broke and found Dan Biggar, who linked with Tipuric as he steamed over the gain-line on the 10 metre line. The flanker had the French defence in disarray as he bowled into the 22 and when he was stopped, Webb was there again to take the offload and send the scoring pass to Matavesi and Biggar’s simple conversion tied the scores. It was a moment to savour. CenturionsToulouse get a pat on the back for becoming the first club to win 100 games in European competitions. They did it by beating Glasgow Warriors 19-11 at home on Sunday, and just pip Munster to the landmark as the Irish side are currently stuck on 99 wins. Chapeau Toulouse! TAGS: Leicester Tigers Lee-ding lightIt is not easy to beat Munster at Thomond Park in a European competition. Only Leicester Tigers and Ulster had done it before but Clermont Auvergne added their name to that exclusive list by winning 16-9 in the European Champions Cup on Saturday.The leading light in their effort was No 8 Fritz Lee, who set the French club off on the right foot by scoring a try from the back of a driving maul in the first minute.He went on to contribute in attack and defence, including a great off-load under pressure to set up Wesley Fofana’s try. Of course, other players had their moments of magic, notably fly-half Camille Lopez with a long-range drop goal and flanker Damien Chouly, who stole a lineout from Paul O’Connell when Munster had an attacking lineout at the death, but Lee was deservedly named Man of the Match.Gimme five: Tommy Bowe grounds the ball in the corner, despite Liam Williams’ efforts Happy days: Aseli Tikoirotuma (right) is all smiles as he celebrates his try with Marland YardeKearney RobbedHarlequins are not having the best season in the Aviva Premiership but Leinster handed them an early Christmas present in the shape of a popped pass from Rob Kearney which was gratefully grabbed by Aseli Tikoirotuma, who ran the length of the pitch to score a crucial try. Harlequins had been 12-9 down at home with 53 minutes gone, then Nick Easter reached over for a try and Kearney threw the interception pass just five minutes later and suddenly they were 21-12 up.Leinster managed to grab a losing bonus point as the final score was 24-18, but they had hoped for more. The SaintsWhat a score!European Champions Toulon came to Welford Road having won their last nine games but Leicester Tigers put a stop to that run thanks to a massive effort from their pack and a gutsy display from 22-year-old fly-half Owen Williams, who kicked 20 points – six penalties and a conversion – in Leicester’s 25-21 victory.What was so good about the young Welshman’s kicking display in this Champions Cup clash was that he recovered from a couple of first-half misses and the horror of having Bryan Habana scoop up a wayward pass of his to score a try which put Toulon 18-16 up in the second half. Williams regathered his composure to keep racking up the points, and finished with a 50-metre penalty to take Leicester to a memorable win.Williams is keeping Freddie Burns out of Leicester’s starting line-up and if he continues in this vein, he will hang onto that No 10 jersey. Give him an inchThere are not many better finishers in the game than Tommy Bowe and he racked up his 26th European try in 58 appearances when he squeezed in at the corner to take Ulster from 14-9 up to 21-9 ahead in the second half against the Scarlets and extinguish any hopes the Welsh region had of snatching a win in Belfast.Even Bowe’s long-time Ireland team-mate Brian O’Driscoll – now on TV duty with BT Sport – doubted that the wing had made it on this occasion, as Liam Williams was doing his best to stop him, but the replays showed he was in. Bowe also gave the scoring pass for a try by the excellent Darren Cave as Ulster claimed their first win of the European season. Disaster for DrewYes, the pass thrown wildly out of a tackle and back across his own 22 by Toulon scrum-half Sebastien Tillous-Borde was a shocker, but Drew Mitchell would still have backed himself to tidy up the loose ball. However, the Aussie wing fumbled and bumbled and it was Leicester hooker Tom Youngs who managed to pick up the rolling ball cleanly and send Brad Thorn in for the try. It put Leicester 13-0 up after 18 minutes of their Champions Cup match and they went on to win. Scarlet Liam Williams was also guilty of a needless tip-tackle and was duly sin-binned for driving Ulster full-back Louis Ludik into the turf when he was already on the ground.last_img read more

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Young people at convention: small in number, big in impact

first_img General Convention 2012, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group By Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 5, 2012 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Young people at convention: small in number, big in impact This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 6, 2012 at 10:19 pm In 1949 or 1950, as a senior in high school, I was a delegate from the Diocese of Olympia to the triennial convention of the United Movement of the Church’s Youth in Oakland, CA. This gathering was held in conjunction with the triennial for the “grown-ups”. It was an exciting and enlightening occasion for me. We had worship services, meetings in which we passed resolutions, and most important, felt a part of the Episcopal church. It was joyous and motivating. After returning home, I was invited to speak at Sunday services of several churches. I think it was important that this meeting was held in conjunction with the larger church and it saddens me that we no longer have this kind of youth event, settling rather for something called “youth presence”. I pray that one day we can return to such a widespread opportunity for youth to be a part of TCE Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rev. Sallie Verrette says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Comments (1) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags General Convention, Members of the Episcopal Youth Presence attend an orientation session with Episcopal Church Public Relations Officer Neva Rae Fox. Photo/Sharon Sheridan[Episcopal New Service — Indianapolis] When Caroline Christie attended the 2009 General Convention with a group of other high school students from the Episcopal Diocese of Newark, she didn’t know what to expect.“I was just going because my friends were going,” she said. “I didn’t know that the Episcopal Church was so big, and everything that they did. It was a really eye-opening experience.”And it whetted her appetite for more. Christie is back for the 77th General Convention, a lay deputy elected at age 17 to represent the Newark diocese along with Gibson Oakley, who was 16 when he was elected in January 2011.Electing two young deputies in one diocese is “unusual but not unique,” said the Rev. Canon Gregory Straub, executive officer and secretary of convention.Most deputies are older. This year 12 are younger than 25, and 20 are ages 25 to 34, said House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson.Caroline Christie of the Diocese of Newark will attend her first General Convention as a deputy with her grandmother, first alternate deputy Marge Christie, a deputy or alternate since 1976. Photo/Sharon SheridanBut young adults are a steady and visible presence at General Convention, from young deputies to members of the Episcopal Church Official Youth Presence to the Episcopal Peace Fellowship Young Adult Presence to groups of young people attending from individual dioceses.Many young deputies first experience General Convention as part of the official youth presence, composed of 18 young people — two per province — who have voice but no vote in the House of Deputies. Anderson wrote the resolution that created it in 1982.“I don’t think there was as much awareness then as there is now about the necessity and desire and real hope to have more young people in the House of Deputies, because now young people are getting elected, whereas then a young person just wouldn’t get elected,” Anderson said. “That’s sort of what set the need for it.”“I think now there’s a thirst in the dioceses — some of them, anyway — to elect younger deputies,” she said.Straub agreed.“There’s no doubt in my mind that especially in more recent years there has been an encouragement among dioceses for young people to run and for diocesan conventions to elect young deputies,” he said.The Diocese of Chicago elected Ian Hallas, 22, as a first alternate deputy in 2006 and as a deputy for 2009 and 2012. The diocese is “very supportive” of youth, not as “being the future of the church, but actually being a present part of the church,” he said. He first visited General Convention in 2003 as an eighth-grader as part of an Episcopal Youth Event.The legislative process “and the whole Robert’s Rules of Order” captured his attention. “I was really interested in the logistics of how the body comes together and operates and still gets things done with 850 or so elected deputies. … I enjoyed paying attention and seeing how things were constructed and how things came together.”He first spoke on the House of Deputies floor at his deputation’s urging when Katharine Jefferts Schori was elected presiding bishop in 2006. “I have no idea what I said, but I was supporting her and I thought it was great,” he said. “It was pretty exhilarating, actually.”In 2009, with the help of his diocese and the Chicago Consultation, he was among a limited number of speakers allowed to speak on a resolution to repeal the 2006 Resolution B033, widely seen as a de facto moratorium on the consecration of gay or lesbian bishops. “I was definitely the youngest person to say something,” said Hallas, who described it as “a defining moment for me in that house.”In Newark, Christie and Oakley met with the rest of the diocesan deputation to prepare for convention.Gibson Oakley confers with fellow deputy Laura Russell during Newark’s Diocesan Convention in January. Photo/Sharon Sheridan“I was actually shocked. We were treated just the same” as the other deputies, Christie said. “In my experience, when young people are appointed, it’s usually just to show that young people are there. I really did feel that we had a voice and we were there as actually members of the deputation and to speak and to have a purpose.”At convention, she particularly will follow the work of the National and International Concerns Committee.Liza Anderson, who just turned 30, followed the last two conventions closely and created and shared a summary of the Blue Book in preparation for this one, the first she’ll attend.She was new to the Diocese of Connecticut when she was elected to serve as a deputy in Indianapolis.“I think the only thing they knew was that I was a young female and a doctoral student at Yale,” she said. “I do think I was elected because I was young. In some ways, that’s frustrating.”Being a member of a sparsely represented demographic also can create pressure. When young people speak, Liza Anderson said, “people want to interpret everything you say as speaking for all young adults. … We’re just as diverse as any other demographic.”A welcome voiceMegan Anderson of the Diocese of Northern California served as a deputy in 2009 and is co-leader of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship’s young adult presence in Indianapolis. She first visited convention via the Episcopal Youth Event in 2003 at age 15 and then was a member of the official youth presence in 2006. “I really did feel like I was taken seriously and listened to,” she said.“A difficult entrance point, especially when you’re a part of these presences, is the tendency for people to see you as just another interest group,” she said “It takes a bit to move people to seeing a young person as something other than just a young person because we’re so rare. But once you kind of get over that initial hurdle, then people are people, and that’s just a part of my wonderful experiences.Older deputies do listen carefully to the words of younger ones, Bonnie Anderson said. “I think they’re listened to because of the hope and expectation that the older deputies have that something new and exciting will come from them.”Likewise, the house pays close attention to the official youth presence, she and Straub each said.“The official youth presence has a tremendous amount of authority in the house,” she said. “The deputies pay a lot of attention to what they have to say.”“I also invite them to choose two members of the youth presence to address the house, so they have an opportunity that the deputies don’t,” she said. “They’re very precious to the House of Deputies. And I also invited young people ages 18 to 30 to make 90-second videos that I’m going to show in the house during the lulls. The question is: What’s your dream for the future of the church?”Two members of the youth presence also will address the House of Bishops and the Episcopal Church Women’s Triennial Meeting, said Bronwyn Clark Skov, Episcopal Church officer for youth ministries.Youth presence members aren’t shy about speaking up, Straub said.“If we think of the youth presence as like a diocese, no diocese is at the microphone more often than the youth presence,” he said. “I mean that in a positive way. They seem to be fearless. They don’t seem to be cowed by the fact that they’re addressing the House of Deputies, and they’re not afraid to ask questions or to express opinions. They use the position very well and often.”For some, participation in the youth presence and then as a deputy leads to further leadership positions.Bryan Krislock of Seattle learned about the youth presence at an Episcopal Youth Event and was appointed for the 2000 General Convention in Denver. He served as a deputy from the Diocese of Spokane in 2006 and 2009 and now is vice chair of the Government and Administration of Mission Committee as a member of Executive Council.Thinking back to 2000, he said: “I didn’t know much about General Convention beforehand. I didn’t really know about the governance or the polity. The experience through the youth presence was really eye-opening. It made me want to come back and run for deputy and … put my name into the hat for executive council.”Megan Anderson followed a similar path, from EYE in 2003 to youth presence to deputy and now to her role with the Episcopal Peace Fellowship, co-leading a young deputation with Jessie Vedanti. She also is secretary of the Standing Commission for Mission and Evangelism.“Some of the [commission] members at first confided in me that they thought I was the token youth representative but came up to me after the first meeting and had to apologize and really say, ‘It’s just such a privilege to have you as a full member of the team.’ That moved me beyond belief,” she said. Serving on the commission has “been one of my favorite experiences thus far in the church.”Anderson is entering her final year as a seminarian at Yale Divinity School.“As an emerging or developing leader in the church, I’m really passionate about building all people up for leadership in the church and really empowering them to find those places that they’re passionate about,” she said.Watching General Convention from a distance this time as he prepares to take the bar exam in a few weeks, Krislock had some advice for new young deputies:“Don’t be afraid to put yourselves out there. Stand up and speak, share your opinions, but also listen and observe. … Listen and see what people are doing and try to learn how your voice can best be heard — kind of see where your opportunities are to make the biggest impact.”“If you don’t know, ask,” he said.And, he said, be willing to change your mind. His philosophy is to “never approach a meeting knowing how I’m going to vote or having my mind made up.”He concluded: “I don’t believe it’s good leadership or good governance to kind of have a particular outcome in mind or so fixed a particular outcome that you’re not willing to be moved.”— Sharon Sheridan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Youth & Young Adults Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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NC bishop named Episcopal Relief & Development board member

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal Relief & Development] Episcopal Relief & Development is pleased to welcome the Rt. Rev. Michael Curry, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, to its Board of Directors.  Prior to his installment in 2000, Bishop Curry served parishes in North Carolina, Ohio and Maryland, implementing social development programs that improved the lives of children and youth in inner-city neighborhoods.  In his current role, he has been a champion of Episcopal Relief & Development’s work, and spearheaded diocesan efforts in support of the NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund, the organization’s church-wide campaign to raise awareness and funds for malaria prevention.  Bishop Curry also served as co-Chair of the national NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund Campaign Advisory Committee.“It is an honor to welcome my brother bishop, Michael Curry, to the Board of Episcopal Relief & Development,” said the Rt. Rev. Robert J. O’Neill, Bishop of the Diocese of Colorado and Chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Board of Directors.  “He is a prophetic voice within our Church for social justice and community engagement, and his visionary leadership will be a blessing to this organization.”As Bishop Curry joins the board, Dr. Catherine “Katy” George steps down, having completed her final term.  Dr. George is a Director in McKinsey & Company’s New Jersey office and a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in New Providence, NJ.“I am immensely grateful to Katy George for her dedicated service on the Board of Episcopal Relief & Development,” said Rob Radtke, the organization’s President.  “Her contributions as Chair of the External Affairs Committee and as a member of the advisory committee for the NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund have helped the organization achieve greater success and increase visibility within the Episcopal Church and beyond.”Bishop Curry joins Episcopal Relief & Development’s 21-member Board effective January 1, 2013.  Board members are invited to serve three-year terms, which may be renewed once.“On behalf of everyone at Episcopal Relief & Development, I want to thank Bishop Curry for agreeing to serve on our Board of Directors,” Radtke commented.  “His guidance and expertise will be invaluable as we seek to raise the organization to the next level and engage more deeply with partner communities, Episcopal churches and peer organizations.”As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization operating under the General Convention of the Episcopal Church, Episcopal Relief & Development is presently governed by a 21-member Board of Directors that includes clergy and lay leaders from around the country. The Honorary Chair of the Board is the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church, and the Chair of the Board is the Rt. Rev. Robert J. O’Neill, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado. Members of the Board are nominated by the Presiding Bishop and the Chair of the Board of Episcopal Relief & Development, with assistance from the Board’s Governance Committee. New members are then elected by the Board, and this decision is ratified by the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church.For more information about the Board of Directors, please visit http://www.er-d.org/BoardofDirectors/. Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (1) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA January 10, 2013 at 5:27 pm Amen. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Relief & Development, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Posted Jan 10, 2013 Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem People Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS NC bishop named Episcopal Relief & Development board member Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

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Central Africa’s Anglicans helping women tackle violence

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By Bellah ZuluPosted Feb 18, 2013 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Central Africa’s Anglicans helping women tackle violence Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Gender Justice Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Africa, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] “The statistics on gender-based violence in Zambia are appalling,” says Grace Mazala Phiri, national programmes director for the Anglican Church in Zambia.As an example she cited a survey conducted in Chipata, a town in Eastern Zambia, from January to March last year. “[This] revealed that within three months alone more than 1,000 women were victims of battering, while over 50 women were raped.“Cases of child abuse were more than 100, with 12 people reported as having died as a result of gender-based violence.”Zambia, is not the only country in Africa that struggles with gender-based violence. It is an issue that cuts across culture, race, religion and socio-economic status. It is defined by the Southern African Development Protocol on Gender and Development as: “All acts perpetuated against women, men, boys and girls on the basis of their sex which causes or could cause them physical, sexual, psychological, emotional or economic harm, including the threat to take such acts…”In reality, it is women and children who suffer most from gender-based violence, which has recently found itself under the international spotlight, especially following two cases of gang-rape, mutilation and murder of women in India and South Africa. The death of 17-year-old South African Anene Booysen has put pressure on Africa to be more proactive in addressing gender-based violence.Long before Booysen’s tragic death, Anglicans were taking steps to address the issue.Phiri said, “Anglicans are taking action to support women and rebuild relationships, so women can reclaim their streets, their communities, their places of work – even their homes – as places which they can use in safety.”While violence and injustice have existed for a long time in homes and even in the church, God’s people have “always had the God-given mandate to protect people that have been unfairly treated and ensure that justice prevails at all times,” Phiri said.On Feb. 11, the Church of the Province of Central Africa (CPCA) held a seminar in Lusaka, Zambia, to discuss gender issues affecting the church and to plan for International Women’s Day (March 8), an occasion which the church sees as an opportunity for women to “reclaim public spaces” in the face of the rising human rights abuses.“We are seeing a rise in gender-based violence against women and girls,” said Faith Gandiya, president of the Mothers’ Union in the Diocese of Harare and a delegate at the seminar. “One of my biggest concerns is that clergy and their wives need to be aware and be able to help people to prevent such occurrences [while] supporting people who are victims.“The Church in Africa still has a long way to go in terms of dealing with issues of gender-based violence because of culture,” she said. “We need to lift ourselves over and above the culture where women are forbidden from talking too much and are supposed to always listen to what a man says. The Church [in Africa] works within this cultural context which is difficult to deal with.”Gender-based violence can have devastating consequences for the victims, including physical, sexual, and mental harm and suffering and, in the worst cases, death. It is widespread in the Southern African region and thus presents what Gandiya says is a “major obstacle to attaining gender equality and equity which are fundamental human rights.”Phiri admitted that she had seen a lot of devastating incidences of gender-based violence during her work in the communities. “We have decided to work with women in rural areas because most of them don’t have enough information as regards their rights because of poor information flow,” she said.The conference delegates acknowledged the many complications that hinder the effective handling of gender-based violence. “Cases within the family are the most difficult to deal with for fear of embarrassment. Most families would rather deal with such issues silently,” she said.Another complication within families in Africa is that gender issues impinge on aspects of “culture and bread and butter.” Phiri said, “With men being the breadwinners in most families, women who have been abused by their husbands will try to avoid the police because they would not want to have their husbands incarcerated despite their pain and suffering.”At the root of gender-based violence are issues of power. A woman who is adequately empowered is placed to deal with physical and emotional abuse. Archbishop Albert Chama, primate of the CPCA who was also present at the meeting, said there is a huge opportunity for the church to act through the engagement of the people at the grassroots.“It’s at the grassroots that the church really is, and by touching the lives of those who are downtrodden, we make the Gospel alive and real. We need to support women all the way until the goal of equality is achieved in all spheres of life: education and property ownership,” he explained.On a continent where traditionally women were never encouraged to own personal property and girls were encouraged to do household chores while the boys went to school, empowerment of women still remains one of the biggest challenges. Thus, the CPCA has decided to work with women through literacy and economic empowerment programs.“We decided to take up programs related to development and gender. We are empowering women to increase their household incomes. We give them loans using a revolving fund with a minimal interest rate. Some of them are keeping livestock and are into farming,” Phiri explained. “We also empower them by monitoring their health so that they are not incapacitated. They are also taught how to read and write which is important for them to gain some degree of independence.”Participants at the meeting, who were drawn from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Malawi, shared experiences and discussed the cultural attitudes to the issue. Specifically they looked at the kind of language that perpetuates gender-based violence, especially against women.The Rev. Canon Christopher Mwawa, general secretary of the Anglican Council of Malawi, said, “Traditional African [sayings] such as ‘This man is as talkative as a woman’ only reinforce the already existing stereotypes against women [and] should be avoided at all costs.”The archbishop encouraged everyone to learn from one another. He said those present should also convince the government in their countries to see the church as “a partner in development” in order to encourage the political will in dealing with the many issues of gender-based violence.“Many people and organizations in Africa have talked about human rights, especially those of women and children, but the church has not been coming out strongly in its advocacy,” said Chama. “We have to be vigilant and make sure that the voice of the church is heard when we speak on behalf of the downtrodden.The archbishop believes that effective engagement of disadvantaged people will “permeate every home, community, congregation” because “people will be made to realize that they have the potential to change their own circumstances from negative to positive for good.” Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

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British bishop welcomes proposed plastic ban

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Tags [Anglican Communion News Service] Bishop of Salisbury Nicholas Holtam recently spoke in favor of U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s potential plan to ban a number of single-use plastic products. Holtam went on to encourage the U.K. to swap the use of cheap plastic with more sustainable alternatives, calling it a “no-brainer.”Read the full article here. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Susan M. Paynter says: Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Comments are closed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA British bishop welcomes proposed plastic ban Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA April 20, 2018 at 1:22 pm It’s so gratifying to hear church leaders speak out like this on the relevant issues of the day. It can’t be right to be silent while the beauty, diversity, and well-being of creation are threatened by thoughtlessness. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Posted Apr 20, 2018 last_img read more

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Committee will propose comprehensive revision of the Book of Common…

first_img Rector Albany, NY James Graham says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Eugene Search says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention, Todd Lane says: James M. Knox says: Joe Thoma says: July 6, 2018 at 1:42 pm This is about far more than semantics, or a petty quibbling over “pronouns”. Language is important. Words represent ideas, and in this context, spiritual realities. There is a reason Christ himself is referred to as The Word. You muck around with the language, and you distort, even destroy, the essence of teaching and people’s understanding of religion. Ultimately, you destroy Faith, because you undermine its foundation of belief. And why? Because a few empowered but very misguided delegates are drunk with power, and a sense of their own importance and personal spiritual “revelations” to set against two millennia of Spiritually inspired tradition. Satan is rubbing his hands with glee! Matt Ouellette says: Comments are closed. July 5, 2018 at 7:01 pm As I’ve mentioned elsewhere, this is not a good idea. We don’t need this kind of divisive process going on right now after we have begun to move on from the gay marriage debate. We need to engage more with our current prayer book as we recover from the aftermath of our previously divisive issue. Also, I oppose any changes to the Lord’s Prayer. We shouldn’t try fundamentally changing the words of Jesus. Our current English translations accurately convey the original meaning of His prayer. July 7, 2018 at 11:06 pm Take a look at the Unitarians and Universalists did in the 1960’s when they pushed through all their reforms. They went from being liberal Christian denominations to post-Christian and lost half their members. Many people point to the Unitarians as being the canary in the coal mine for liberal Protestants in the USA. I fear the Episcopal Church is lining up to be UU’s with a better wardrobe. July 5, 2018 at 7:39 pm Amen Matt! Enough novelty, innovation and divisiveness. Give it a rest. If the Lord’s Prayer is messed with that will cook it with many who would otherwise tolerate other novel rites that they don’t have to experience each Sunday. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Hugh Hansen,, P. says: The Rev. Tyler Richards says: July 8, 2018 at 7:18 pm This entire conversation strikes home to me. As the parish coordinator for a very small church that hasn’t been able to afford a priest for more than 3 years , I was recently, ( well, last lent) confronted with the modernist language issue in a big way. A member of our vestry asked to lead a “Bible” study on the Gospel of Mark and I gave him permission to do so. In the first lesson he presented material stating that the Jesus of Mark’s Gospel is a fiction, and should be regarded with the same sense of fun that we approach Harry Potter by JK Rowling. He went on to say that belief in a literal resurrection was akin to belief in the tooth fairy. Thankfully our wonderful Sr. Warden told him in no uncertain terms that he could NOT teach that “theory ” in our church. I am frightened about this “new” language and ideology. Matt Ouellette says: Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab July 6, 2018 at 2:04 pm Couldn’t agree more James! July 8, 2018 at 4:30 pm Don’t have to look far, do we? In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 6, 2018 at 12:14 am Thank you, Matt. It’s nice to know that others (most others) aren’t in agreement with the HoD. Matt Ouellette says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA July 5, 2018 at 11:10 pm Amen! July 6, 2018 at 12:31 pm Amen Matt Ouellette says: Grace Buchanan says: July 5, 2018 at 11:52 pm As we have not lived into the Baptismal Theology of the current Book of Common Prayer, to move forward with revising the book seems ill-timed and ill-advised. While I am sympathetic to those who long for gender neutral language, an idea that I am not opposed to, those concerns can be addressed by creating supplements for the Prayer Book as it stands without rewriting it. There is more to revising a prayer book than just “giving the people what they want.” Changing a prayer book changes the DNA of our worship and I for one do not think we are ready for such a thing. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Mike Grigsby-Lane says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 5, 2018 at 9:31 pm To be clear, I’m not against the use of more gender-neutral and feminine imagery for God. As God transcends gender, it’s no more wrong to use female images to describe God than male ones. However, I am against theologically fuzzy expressions which sometimes are heretical (e.g. using the modalist Creator, Redeemer, Sanctifier form as an alternative name for the Trinity). We need to make sure we’ve thought through the images we use before we start making revisions, or we could end up losing essential doctrines implicit in our prayers. Spending more time with the 1979 BCP would be the best way to go right now, I think. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 6, 2018 at 11:29 am Who will rid us of these meddlesome, tone-deaf Baby Boomers? July 5, 2018 at 10:05 pm Start with this simple data. Find out how many Episcopalians flat out ignore the contemporary version of the Lord’s Prayer in the 1979 BCP, and opt instead to maintain the traditional version. That should give the flavor for how well-received “expanded” prayer tinkering has been since 1979. Rector Bath, NC July 6, 2018 at 9:55 pm This is very troubling. We have lost 1/3 of our membership since the last prayer book revision. Attendance is down and continuing to fall. We need to be focused on the current liturgy and trying to broaden our appeal. I don’t think this is the way to do it. Rev. Dr. James Hargis says: July 5, 2018 at 10:37 pm I would rather see an American version of the Church of England’s Common Worship be adopted as a replacement for the 1979 BCP. July 5, 2018 at 10:45 pm I don’t think quotas for representation are an answer here, but unless there are others not shown: 10 guys, 4 women (I think), 2 members might be under the age of 40 or 45; all seem to be white. Haven’t we had a conversation or two about such matters…I’m at a loss. Charles Jordan says: Jim Shoemaker says: Stephen Nesbitt says: July 6, 2018 at 7:45 am It will be like New Coke! What could go wrong? Doug Desper says: July 8, 2018 at 7:03 pm Amen! Comments navigation Newer comments Grant Barber says: July 6, 2018 at 7:12 pm I agree..Also Didn’t Jesus say “Father” when he prayed? Yes he did! So leave the Lords Prayer alone. Stop trying to modernize God and tell him what he should believe. Anymore changes especially this one and I will leave the church as well. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH John Hobart says: Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 6, 2018 at 5:16 am Round 2 of churches leaving and here come once again lawsuits eating millions of $$$$$$$.Now is not the time to due a rewrite of the Prayer Book. At a time the Church is healing from all the brake away congregations, another body blow and the Church will most likely down for the count. By Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 5, 2018 Steve Price says: July 6, 2018 at 4:09 pm Heather, many don’t have a problem with limited expansive language. It has a place and I’m for it until something ridiculous like “Baker woman God” gets a serious place. It’s only a huge barrier when the direct imagery used by Jesus in the Lord’s Prayer becomes supplanted by whatever images modern revisionists believe touches their soul better. How about, instead, learning about the imagery as used by Jesus (Father/Son relation) and cease creating a boutique church that seeks to satisfy egos and whims.Like some others I wonder how sufficient the oxygen level is at General Convention. Ideas cooked up on List Serve, in Committee Rooms, and among 1,000 people are not sounding solid nor are draconian ideas squaring with the reality of a Church whose downward spiral can no longer be hidden – but ignored, yes. We should remember that no one ever erected a statue to a committee or a convention, and at times like this we find out why. July 6, 2018 at 12:15 am It’s too bad that there wasn’t social media when they were at the same stage of planning the 1979 prayer book. I’m wondering if the commentary would be same as we have here. I like the current prayer book, and I also like some of the alternative liturgies and prayer books from throughout the Anglican Communion that have been used at various worship services. This sounds like it’s going to be a long and drawn-out process (with a 2030 proposed release date). My guess is that the faces on the committee with change as the years go by as well. As this is TEC, there are bound to be lots of opportunities to provide feedback along the way. I’m reserving judgement until they actually come out with something for us to have an opinion about July 6, 2018 at 9:24 pm Unnecessary, a total waste of time and resources. Seek deeper engagement with the current BCP. Kathleen A Munroe says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Members of the Committee to Receive the Report of Resolution A169, which is considering revision of the Book of Common Prayer, clap along while singing a hymn before the start of their morning meeting on July 5. Photo: Melodie Woerman/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] The Committee to Receive the Report of Resolution A169, which is considering resolutions to revise of the Book of Common Prayer, voted on July 5 to propose to General Convention a plan for comprehensive revision of the current 1979 prayer book. The resolution, which will be an amendment to Resolution A068, authorizes the start of a revision process that could culminate in a new prayer book in 2030.The resolution was developed by a subcommittee appointed on July 4 to incorporate the process of revision specified in Resolution A068, as well as calls for inclusive and expansive language for God and human beings, which were presented during hearings, also on July 4.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.The proposal calls for the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to begin the revision process using the 1979 prayer book as the starting point and to utilize “inclusive and expansive language and imagery for humanity and divinity” in making changes. It also will “incorporate and express understanding, appreciation and care for God’s creation.”Exempted from the inclusive language revision will be Holy Eucharist Rite 1 and the church’s historical documents printed in the prayer book. In a split between the deputies and bishops who meet together but vote separately, exempting the Lord’s Prayer from revision was adopted by the bishops but rejected by the deputies.That means that the deputies’ version will be presented to the House of Deputies when the matter is taken up in a special order of business on July 6 at 4 p.m. If adopted there with that clause intact, the bishops’ version will be debated in the House of Bishops. Reconciliation then would be needed between the two versions.This resolution carries through the background materials associated with the original A068, which describe a 12-year process of prayer book revision. This includes a comprehensive survey of the liturgies in use in congregations, consultation with other provinces of the Anglican Communion, drafting committees and an overall editor. The plan is to gather data over the next three years, with a complete revision by 2024.That proposed book would undergo three years of trial use throughout the Episcopal Church, with a first vote by General Convention in 2027. Because revision of the prayer book is part of the church’s Constitution, adoption of a new book requires votes in two consecutive General Conventions to take effect, placing final approval on the agenda in 2030.– Melodie Woerman is director of communications for the Diocese of Kansas and is a member of the ENS General Convention reporting team. Doug Desper says: July 6, 2018 at 2:24 pm Dear Friends– as a cradle Episcopalian from generations of Episcopalians, I wince when I hear God the Almighty Creator reduced to one human gender– “Father”. I feel the same about “Mother.” Such terminology creates a confusion between God and human males which is unhelpful to all, and has contributed to patriarchal horrors. Those who want to gender everything don’t recognize the feminine aspects of Sophia/the Holy Spirit, giving further evidence of one-sided sexism. We humans need to hold onto our Anglican via media tradition which has grown and continues to grow usually for the better- remember the dire predictions if we adopted the 1979 BCP? Or having women be ordained priests???? We’ve grown in that ministry, thank God. We can grown in not reducing God to one aspect of the Almighty. Years ago when I was struggling with this reduction a theologian said to me, well, if God were solely male, what are you doing here? We both laughed happily. I expect that God the Almighty & Loving Creator has dimensions we humans cannot imagine. We should be loving ourselves– to all God’s children. Being expansive and inclusive is central to Jesus’ ministry. Thank you. Submit an Event Listing July 6, 2018 at 7:54 am I am quite sure that it won’t! Scripture is clear that God adds to the church-not our gimmicks! I believe that people leave the church because we look more and more like the world around us. We want so much to fit in with what we think the world wants that we no longer look like Christ! July 6, 2018 at 11:51 am Sounds like another fallacious example of TEC’s futility at trying to be so culturally with it (relevant), that it loses the liturgical beauty that has stood the test of the times. Some revision is always appropriate, but without sacrificing the profound theological majesty. If we try to be all things to all people, the church loses. We must stand for something, lest we fall for everything. Christ stood for something good, inspirational, and salvific! TEC must, too. July 6, 2018 at 4:57 am 2030 you say. If I make it to the age of 82 in 12 years. By then I will turn down the volume of my hearing aids with the hope of never hearing a word from the proposed new Prayer Book. Prayer Book Revision Comments navigation Newer comments David Stevens says: center_img Lloyd Newell says: July 6, 2018 at 1:42 pm So glad the House of Bishops took a stand with regard to tampering with the “gender identity” of God the Father in the Lord’s Prayer. I hope they will have the guts to stand up to this misguided force for ultimate annihilation of Christian theology in TEC. One has to wonder–what gets poured into the “punchbowl” at these Conventions? I suspect they are giddy with “power”, and have the vanity to suppose they can trash 2000 years of spiritually inspired tradition based on their personal “revelations”? I think it’s really an issue of egos. Or do these misguided folks check their common sense, and conscience, with Satan, at the door when they enter? Oops–I forgot! It’s de rigueur among those folks not to believe in the Devil anymore. Featured Events July 6, 2018 at 6:23 pm Have you given any thought to the fact that maybe your church doesn’t have more then 50 on a Sunday because your church refuses to change? I go to the fastest growing episcopal church in my diocese and I can tell you that spirit led change leads to growth. We have to be willing to die to self to experience resurrection. I believe I’ve read that somewhere. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 6, 2018 at 1:17 pm Although I would like to see more gender neutral language used in some ares, such as replacing “men” with “people”, and using the word God in place of His or Him where applicable, I too, do not think we have plumbed the depths of the 1979 prayer book to the point where we should make major changes. It is a wonderful resource for prayer and information, and I think that making it too neutral and ‘social mores’ friendly will result in a loss of our identity as Episcopalians. That said, I do love the contemporary version of the Lord’s prayer. It feels to me like I am having a conversation with God when I say it with feeling. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Doug Desper says: July 6, 2018 at 8:02 pm The biggest problem with prayer book revision right now is that it is a divisive process, and we still need to deal with the aftermath of the divisive marriage equality debate. We should sort that out first before taking on another divisive issue. I also think some of the concern here with prayer book revision is a lack of trust in some of the leadership who will be in charge of prayer book revision. There are some in leadership who want to take the prayer book in an extremely theologically liberal direction (e.g. remove or radically rewrite the Nicene Creed, rewrite the Lord’s Prayer, etc.) rather than simply express the orthodox faith in a more gender-inclusive manner. Therefore, I suspect many here would rather wait the revise the prayer book until there is newer leadership that will be more theologically careful with their revisions. Jason VanBorssum says: Cheryl Dornbush says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Matt Ouellette says: Todd Lane says: Rector Washington, DC Liturgy & Music, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 5, 2018 at 11:37 pm Picture of receiving committee engaging in ” happy,clappy” hymn singing is not an encouraging sight for those of us interested in the preservation of our traditional liturgy.Is it true then that the proposal is to replace “the Blessed Virgin Mary ” with” our sister Mary “and the “Holy Catholic Church “with the ” body of Christ”? Wouldn’t it just be easier to close our red doors and join the Baptist Church? James Graham says: Mark Bigley says: July 6, 2018 at 8:01 am Grant: in a church that barely musters a half-million attendance on Sundays every voice should count. I’m not sure what planet some of these movers for changing the Prayer Book live on, but in the real world we can’t afford to keep alienating what’s left of this Church. Supplemental rites? Yes. New Prayer Book with draconian changes in theology to satisfy theological revisionists? Why go there? Committee rooms and convention floors are not the best pulse for the wider Church. General Convention is a big playground of thought, innovation, and impulse. That doesn’t equally square with reality when most of our churches don’t have more than 50 on Sundays with half without regular clergy. Time to come down to earth. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 5, 2018 at 10:47 pm A change to the Lord’s Prayer that goes beyond being a translation from the Greek to being something new or innovative runs the risk of putting the Episcopal Church outside the mainstream norm of historic Christianity. Also, what about other historic prayers? The Creeds? James Graham says: Grace Buchanan says: Committee will propose comprehensive revision of the Book of Common Prayer Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL July 6, 2018 at 11:12 am Would the last person out of the Episcopal Church please extinguish the sanctury lamp? Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Heather Huyck says: General Convention 2018, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Neal Campbell says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 7, 2018 at 9:27 am I agree with you, but the Commission appears to have an agenda. Whether or not us, the congregants, agree is not their concern. Change the Lord’s Prayer? I’m happy the bishops don’t support this.I also notice the commission a massive lack of generational diversity on the Commission. Where are the young people (sans ine or two)? Why are they, the fiture of the church not fully included? Is it because they overwhelmingly prefer traditional or contemplative prayer? Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 5, 2018 at 8:16 pm I’m sure this will turn around the sharp decline in membership! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA July 5, 2018 at 9:14 pm Revision of the BCP, especially to incorporate “gender neutral” reference to God the Father would be a pernicious and perhaps fatal blow to what is left of our church. Will these folks never stop? I don’t think so–unless we stand up to them. I, for one, will leave immediately, and find another church home–one that isn’t hell-bent on theological revisionism and heresy. I don’t think I am alone in my position. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 6, 2018 at 8:35 am Good point, Rev. Tyler. The current status quo allows parishes to experiment with the use of more gender-neutral and feminine images of God in our liturgies, so there’s no real urgency to revise the Prayer Book right now on that basis. Also, the current Prayer Book, via Rite III, has rubrics in place to allow priests to experiment with gender-inclusive language. We just don’t need to start making these revisions to our prayer book at this time. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN July 5, 2018 at 10:28 pm You are not alone! Rev. Dr. James Hargis says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Eugene Search says: Richard Lammlin says: Comments (47) Eugene Search says: July 5, 2018 at 7:55 pm Good, succinct story — Thanks, Melodie! July 5, 2018 at 10:27 pm I concur! Lloyd Newell says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 6, 2018 at 8:37 am I agree, Lloyd, which is exactly why I think now is the wrong time to begin such a divisive process. Rector Knoxville, TN July 6, 2018 at 11:52 am Sounds like another fallacious example of TEC’s futility at trying to be so culturally with it, that it loses the liturgical beauty that has stood the test of the times. Some revision is always appropriate, but without sacrificing the profound theological majesty. If we try to be all things to all people, the church loses. We must stand for something, lest we fall for everything. Christ stood for something good, inspirational, and salvific! TEC must, too. Doug Desper says: Marion Johnson says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Vicki Kelsey says: Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 7, 2018 at 7:57 pm So the Historical Documentments are no longer important enough to be in the BCP? I wonder why? No (good) reason was given. Niebuhr was right. Church follows culture. Such a pattern of erasing history or revising it seems to be the mainstream. History reveals other times, places and purposes when history was erased or revised. I wonder what the real reasons are this time? It’s obvious to me. Anyone else? David Stevens says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Joel Watson says: Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

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San Joaquin Episcopalians’ 17-day pilgrimage concludes with ‘Immigrant Day of…

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL San Joaquin Bishop David Rice, left, and Warren Starr, a member of St. James Cathedral in Fresno, California, lead the Pilgrimage of Hope’s team of walkers. Photo: Nelson Serrano[Episcopal News Service] San Joaquin Episcopalians’ 17-day, 220-mile “Pilgrimage of Hope” started in Fresno and ended May 20 in Sacramento, where they joined nearly a thousand other activists for California’s 23rd annual “Immigrant Day of Action.”Chanting “Vivan los imigrantes,” the activists met with lawmakers, advocating for extending health coverage to adults who are in the country illegally, and against adding a citizenship question to the 2020 U.S. Census. About 1.8 million of California’s 3 million uninsured people are immigrants in the country illegally, according to legislative staffers. Of those, about 1.26 million have incomes low enough to qualify them for the state’s Medicaid program.San Joaquin Bishop David Rice, who addressed the gathering and met with state lawmakers, said, “They saw us. They heard us. It crystallizes that we’re here. And they know we’ll be back. There are too many voices and too many needs that are yet to be enunciated in San Joaquin for us not to respond in some significant way in an ongoing fashion.”‘Extraordinary generosity, radical hospitality’From pausing for prayers in fields with farmworkers to stopping for selfies and impromptu livestreamed interviews, the pilgrims experienced extraordinary generosity and radical hospitality, Rice said. The group also helped to raise awareness and even developed a social media following at #gopilgrimsgo and #thepilgrimageofhope.“Everywhere we went, the impetus was to raise awareness regarding the status and plight of immigrants and our refugee sisters and brothers,” Rice told Episcopal News Service recently.“Every night, we held awareness-raising events, a kind of Immigration 101 about the pilgrimage and why we were doing it,” engaging people who hosted the group in local Episcopal, Lutheran, United Methodist and Roman Catholic churches, Rice said. Afterward, pilgrims were overnight guests at church members’ homes. The stories of those they encountered along the road, from “someone saying they’ve been in the immigration process for 25 years, to a grandmother pushing her grandchild in a stroller with us for 10 miles” became the stories they shared nightly, he said.A holy ruckus: ‘We walk because they walk’The Rev. Nancy Key, a co-chair of the pilgrimage planning committee, joined the May 4 “grand send-off” at St. James Cathedral in Fresno and was in Sacramento to welcome the pilgrims when they arrived.“Their mantra became ‘we walk because they walk,’ yet our walk is so much different,” Key told ENS. “Even though we’re trying to raise a holy ruckus, to educate, to create awareness, to make an impact” the pilgrimage was nothing compared to the hardships of those who are walking to the border in hope of a better life for their families.Rain and shine, the pilgrims’ weekdays began with morning prayer and an 8 a.m. start, in scorching 90-degree heat and sudden torrential downpours, through cities and farmland, stopping every five miles to pray, according to Wilson Colon, who drove a support vehicle. “I tended to a lot of blistered feet and tight tendons,” said Colon, a parishioner at St. Paul’s Church in Modesto.Lee Halkias, 75, a member of St. Raphael’s Church in Oakhurst, couldn’t join the walkers but wanted to help, “so I loaded my motor home with food and supplies and joined them,” he explained.“My dad was born in 1894 in Greece,” Halkias told ENS. “He came over here at 15 years old. It was a different system; easier to become a citizen. You didn’t have all the obstacles.”On Sundays, the group worshipped in host churches. Some walkers joined the core group of about a dozen pilgrims at various points along the way.Like Erin Rausch, 39, a former Stockton resident who recently moved to Boise, Idaho, and joined the pilgrimage in Modesto, about halfway to Sacramento.Rausch, a Boise State University coordinator for student service projects, said that she “carried homesickness for my 3 1/2-year-old son Jonathan with me” as a reminder that “so many folks, whether it be in detention centers or elsewhere, are separated from their children.”And yet, “I had the certainty that after this I’d get to see him,” she added. “That is not true for our brothers and sisters in this situation.”For some, the changing landscape and temperatures prompted new awareness.“The first day I walked, it was really, really tough,” Rausch recalled. “It was very hot. We had 16 miles to go. “I was really struck by the experience of walking through a city and seeing how folks who don’t have access to cars really must experience it. Everything is fast cars, fast food, and really, in disregard for folk who may have to experience it a bit more slowly.”Sometimes, she felt invisible; other times, they were stopped by passersby. “As we walked along Eldorado Road in Stockton, a woman driving in the opposite direction stopped her car, rolled down the window and said, ‘I need to talk to you,’” Rausch recalled.The driver was a 64-year-old woman who had been taken from her parents as an infant and then returned to her family at about age 4. “Her life story, literally, just bubbled up – how she was separated from her family. And even though this happened a long time ago, she was still afraid and said we couldn’t show her face or say her name. It reminded me of just how broken our immigration system has been for decades, and how much damage it has done to people and families for such a long time,” Rausch said.A few blocks later, two men in a truck flagged down the group. “They asked us about what we’re doing and we tell them and they get so excited,” Rausch recalled. “One of them turns on his phone and starts livestreaming the entire conversation. He was on his way to work, and everything we said, he’d turn the phone to himself and translate into Spanish” for friends and family.She added, “There is a piece of this that is really about race and socioeconomic status. There are things that, because I’m white I can do, and it’s important that I stand up for what is right and what needs to be done and how things need to change so we can have a humane immigration system.”San Joaquin Canon to the Ordinary the Rev. Anna Carmichael said the pilgrimage “became our own walk to Emmaus,” as the group prayed, laughed, sang and danced their way to Sacramento. “We began to recognize Jesus in the people we broke bread with every day,” she said.It also was filled with unexpected surprises.“We didn’t expect that in Livingston, at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, two of our dinner companions would tell us their stories of crossing the border as children,” she wrote in a blog post on the diocesan website. “Now, in their 40s, they have yet to return to Mexico. They left brothers and parents and other family behind. With tears in her eyes, Flor shared that her brothers think she has forgotten them because it’s been over 30 years since she’s seen them.”“They walked with us the next day,” Carmichael told ENS. “It was not something we could have planned for.”Receiving hospitality from strangers was incredible, Rausch said.“It seems like a small thing, but in the late afternoon just a period of rest is amazing. They fed us dinner, allowed us to tell our stories, and then members of their churches would take us into their homes. It was amazing.“There were folks who put us up who do not agree with what we are doing,” she added. “Yet, they were willing to provide the hospitality and really open their homes to someone who needed a place to stay. That was really amazing to me in a country that is so divided right now.”Carmichael said that hearing those difficult questions, “made me more compassionate and empathetic.”“Instead of shutting down, I was able to listen deeper and have those hard conversations with people, and not be defensive,” she said. “But to say, ‘Look we don’t have all the answers, but we do have a responsibility to our brothers and sisters, if we claim we see Christ in everybody.“But that … doing this pilgrimage meant we put into action what we say we believe. I feel almost more convicted in my faith because of it.”– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Immigration Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release By Pat McCaughanPosted May 24, 2019 Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH San Joaquin Episcopalians’ 17-day pilgrimage concludes with ‘Immigrant Day of Action’ Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

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Episcopal Church in South Carolina outlines plans for bishop transition

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Elections Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Posted Jun 11, 2019 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church in South Carolina outlines plans for bishop transition New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal Church in South Carolina] The Standing Committee of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina on June 11 issued a letter to the people of the diocese regarding transition plans for episcopal leadership. A copy of the letter can be viewed here, and the text of the letter follows.Dear Faithful People of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina,“The gifts he gave were that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until all of us come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to maturity, to the measure of the full stature of Christ.” – Ephesians 4:11-13In January of this year, your Standing Committee began exploring options for the future of the Episcopacy in our diocese. Over the course of these past several months we have discerned that our diocese is ready for the next faithful step as we continue to “grow into the full stature of Christ.”In our meeting on May 23, the Standing Committee voted unanimously to initiate a process that will lead to our calling for the election of a full-time Bishop Diocesan. With that goal in mind, the Standing Committee is working to find a full-time Bishop Provisional who can provide episcopal leadership during the transition period ahead.As you are aware, Bishop Skip Adams has been our Bishop Provisional for nearly three years and plans to conclude his time with us by the end of 2019, or as soon as a successor is in place. Bishop Adams has been working on a part-time basis for these three years, and both he and the Standing Committee are convinced that our next bishop needs to be full-time to meet the needs of this growing Diocese.Therefore, the Standing Committee continues to work in consultation with the Right Rev. Todd Ousley of the Episcopal Church’s Office for Pastoral Development on two fronts: First, to identify persons for the Standing Committee to consider for the role of full-time bishop to serve our diocese in the interim, and second, to prepare for an official call to election for a full-time Bishop Diocesan.As you may know, electing a bishop is to engage in a significant process of discernment. From the time such a call is issued until a new bishop is ordained and consecrated typically takes 18 months to 2 years. The Standing Committee will oversee that process, which typically includes the formation of search and transition committees, the creation of a diocesan profile, and a period of nominations before the slate is announced. An electing convention would be called. The election then must receive consent from a majority of the House of Bishops and a majority of the Standing Committees of the 110 other dioceses of The Episcopal Church. Upon the successful completion of the canonical consent process, the bishop-elect can be ordained and consecrated.We are developing a plan and timeline for this process in consultation with Bishop Ousley and will be able to announce more details in the weeks ahead. Please know the Standing Committee is committed to keep everyone informed along the way and to be as clear and transparent as possible throughout the process.Please remember that we are at the very beginning of what we believe to be a major step forward in “building up the body of Christ” in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina. We will continue to update you on the next steps as they unfold.Your Standing Committee asks that prayers begin for all involved in this process. Pray for +Skip, our bishop, the councils and committees of our diocese; for all diocesan leadership and all who might be called upon to serve in this process. Most of all, we ask your prayers for those persons whom the Holy Spirit will call forward to provide episcopal leadership for our Diocese.Faithfully,The Standing Committee of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

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House of Bishops opens fall meeting with discussions of same-sex…

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group House of Bishops opens fall meeting with discussions of same-sex spouse exclusion from Lambeth 2020 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL By David PaulsenPosted Sep 17, 2019 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing House of Bishops Fall 2019 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 El Camino Real Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves introduces an afternoon session about the Lambeth Conference on Sept. 17 at the House of Bishops meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Minneapolis, Minnesota] The Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops gathered here on Sept. 17 to begin a four-day meeting where the question of the Lambeth Conference 2020 loomed from the outset, both as a point of punctuation in Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s opening sermon and as the scheduled topic of discussion for the first afternoon.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, in calling all bishops in the Anglican Communion to attend the Lambeth Conference next summer, chose to invite gay and lesbian bishops but not their spouses, a plan he saw as a way to balance the divisions in the communion, but one that drew criticism, including from within The Episcopal Church. By the time Lambeth starts on July 22, The Episcopal Church will have at least three bishops with same-sex spouses.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preaches during the opening Eucharist of the House of Bishops meeting on Sept. 17. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceCurry alluded in his sermon to the variety of responses that Episcopal bishops are considering.“We are going to Lambeth, but some of us can’t and some of us won’t. We’ll each have to make a decision of conscience, and that decision of conscience must be respected,” Curry said, adding that he will attend. “I’m going as a witness to the way of love that Jesus has taught me.”An estimated 134 bishops and bishops-elect are attending this House of Bishops meeting, held in the Courtyard by Marriott hotel in downtown Minneapolis. Two of those attending have same-sex spouses: New York Assistant Bishop Mary Glasspool and Maine Bishop Thomas Brown. A third, the Rev. Bonnie Perry, is scheduled to be consecrated bishop of Michigan on Feb. 8, 2020.The bishops, at their March meeting, approved a statement saying that, while a majority of them plan to attend Lambeth, they are “aggrieved and distressed” by Welby’s decision to exclude same-sex spouses.At that time, Glasspool was The Episcopal Church’s only openly gay bishop whose spouse had been barred from attending Lambeth. Brown was consecrated as bishop three months later, on June 22. In March, the only other active bishop in the Anglican Communion to whom Welby’s decision was known to apply was Diocese of Toronto Bishop Suffragan Kevin Robertson.The topic came up again in the late April/early May meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council in Hong Kong, where Welby spoke about his decision.“I ask your forgiveness where I made mistakes,” Welby said at the conclusion of that meeting, which produced a successful resolution spearheaded by Oklahoma Bishop Ed Konieczny.In the House of Bishops’ afternoon discussion of Lambeth, Konieczny summarized the negotiations in Hong Kong. He said representatives from across the Anglican Communion ultimately came together in support of language that was “a reaffirmation of our respect for the dignity of all people,” including specifically LGBTQ Christians.The spirit of Anglican interdependence should serve as a guide for Episcopal bishops planning to attend Lambeth, Konieczny said. Other Anglican provinces don’t always feel that The Episcopal Church listens to their experiences and concerns.“We are in a place in the communion where we have an opportunity to turn a corner and be in a relationship with folks, but we have to do more listening than talking,” he said.Similar points were made by both Curry and El Camino Real Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves in their remarks in the afternoon session about Lambeth. Gray-Reeves serves as vice chair of the House of Bishops.“Whatever else the Lambeth Conference is for you and for the church … it is an amazing cross-cultural experience,” she said.And Curry urged the bishops who will attend Lambeth to bring a spirit of humility.“Humility for us as Americans is hard. We are quick to speak and slow to listen,” Curry said. “I am quick to speak and slow to listen, and to listen and to really hear.” He encouraged the Episcopal bishops, as they engage with bishops from around the world, “to hear each other, to receive each other, to be honest with each other, to make space for each other, to love each other.”And although issues of human sexuality have been a point of contention at previous gatherings of worldwide Anglican bodies, Curry said he expects less tension at Lambeth 2020.“I don’t expect a battle royal,” he said. “I pray that I’m right about that.”Dallas Bishop George Sumner agreed. In presenting a brief history of the Lambeth Conference and details about next year’s gathering, he said about 600 bishops and 500 spouses have registered so far. “A battle royal is not what they’re looking for,” Sumner said.Dallas Bishop George Sumner provides an overview of the history of the Lambeth Conference and plans for Lambeth 2020. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceSumner was one of eight bishops who, until last year, forbade use of The Episcopal Church’s trial rites for same-sex weddings in their dioceses. Sumner and six of those bishops relented in response to a 2018 General Convention resolution and created procedures for same-sex couples to marry. Albany Bishop William Love, who is among the bishops attending the meeting this week in Minneapolis, is the only who still refuses to allow the rites, and he now faces potential disciplinary action for that decision.Even if the Anglican bishops at Lambeth downplay human sexuality as an issue, Welby’s decision made attending Lambeth problematic for Episcopal bishops who support same-sex marriage and who take offense at Welby’s exclusion of some spouses merely because of their sexuality.Michigan Bishop Wendell Gibbs spoke briefly in his remarks about Welby’s decision.“I am extremely disappointed at the archbishop’s choice of not inviting some of the spouses,” Gibbs said. “Perhaps he shouldn’t have invited any. That would have been another statement altogether. But he did what he did, and now we must be the church representing the church.”Gibbs added that he won’t attend Lambeth, not because he doesn’t want to go but because he will have handed the reins of his diocese over to Michigan bishop-elect Perry by that time.Massachusetts Bishop Alan Gates announced that he would not attend Lambeth because some spouses would be excluded. He suggested the cost of attending the conference to nurture relationships with brothers and sisters around the Anglican Communion was too high if it threatened a break in his relationships with brothers and sisters within The Episcopal Church. Other bishops and spouses continue to deliberate on whether to attend Lambeth in light of Welby’s exclusion of same-sex spouses.Glasspool told Episcopal News Service that she plans to attend Lambeth and her wife, Becki Sander, though not invited to the conference, will travel to England with Glasspool. Brown, bishop of Maine, told ENS he and his husband, the Rev. Thomas Mousin, have not yet decided how to respond to Welby’s invitation to Brown, which specifically excluded Mousin. Perry said she and her wife, the Rev. Susan Harlow, are still considering what to do, especially since Perry is less than five months from being consecrated bishop and therefore hasn’t yet received an invitation.Bishop Mary Glasspool, left, talks with her wife, Becki Sander, during a break in the House of Bishops meeting. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceMuch of the rest of the Sept. 17 afternoon session was limited to general preparation for attending Lambeth. Gray-Reeves said a more extensive discussion of how individual bishops will respond to the invitations and exclusions is scheduled for Sept. 20, the last day of the meeting.Other issues were taken up during the day, including in Curry’s wide-ranging morning sermon. Curry preached for 30 minutes and made several references to today’s political climate that he sought to infuse with Christian urgency rather than partisan fervor.“I’m not being political. This is biblical,” Curry said.Invoking Isaiah’s command to “look to the rock” of God for spiritual stability, Curry downplayed The Episcopal Church’s recently released parochial report data showing membership and attendance losses, and he rejected rhetoric that urges Americans to look backward, such as “Make America Great Again.”Isaiah wasn’t “pining for the past. He’s summoning providence, summoning up principles and values,” Curry said. “This isn’t about pining for the past. This is about standing on solid ground that cannot be shaken.”Curry, however, reached into the past himself for an example that drew a parallel to the United States’ foundational principles. The Founding Fathers may have been “hypocrites,” particularly regarding slavery, because their reality didn’t fully live up to their lofty ideals, but those ideals still matter, Curry said, reciting the opening lines of the Declaration of Independence and then the full Pledge of Allegiance.“‘Indivisible. Indivisible,’” he boomed, “‘with liberty and justice,’ not just for some … ‘liberty and justice for all.’ That’s America.”The bishops responded by briefly filling the ballroom with their applause.“We will catalyze a revival,” Curry continued, “a revival in this nation, a revival in our church, a revival to the principles and to the God who is the author of them.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY House of Bishops, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

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