Month: April 2021

People

first_imgDecorations, toppings and inclusions specialist Nimbus has appointed PAUL COBBET as business development manager, with a brief to open up new markets for the company, particularly within the foodservice sector. Cobbett joins the company after a five-year period at Oury Clark Consulting. Coding and marking solution supplier Markem has appointed PAUL MORICAN as sales manager for the north and north-east. Morican previously worked for companies supplying small character inkjets and packaging production equipment. New York Bagel brand company Maple Leaf Foods has appointed FRANCK HOUSSAYE as new product development manager. Houssaye trained as a patissier in France and then worked for British Bakeries and Allied Bakeries.Handmade pasty manufacturer Proper Cornish has appointed MATTHEW BOWEN as commercial manager. Bowen joins the company from Tamar Foods, where he was responsible for the account management of retail chains such as Sainsbury’s and Waitrose.Two new vice-presidents have joined the Freight Transport Association to support FTA president John Russell; REBECCA JENKINS, managing director of the Lane Group and ANDY HAINES, head of logistics at Tate & Lyle Sugars Europe.Bakehouse has recruited five new national account managers. The recruits include retail national accounts managers ADRIAN DODDS and FIONA BONHAM, and wholesale national account manager MELANIE MCLEOD. Dodds has extensive experience in account management handling for major UK retailers and Bonham joins the firm from Winterbotham Darby, where she gained experience selling bakery products. Macleod comes from Kraft Foods, where she worked with a number of major retail and foodservice accounts.The company has also appointed GREG WOODHEAD as NPD and technical support and Leila Russell as marketing assistant. Meanwhile, DAVID PLUMMER has been promoted to business development representative for the wholesale sector.Ingredients supplier Zeelandia has created a new position within its engineering department. In order to place more emphasis on their industrial projects, ADRIAN RIDNG has been appointed engineering projects manager. His position covers Zeelandia’s entire portfolio.Food co-packer for brand owners in the FMCG market Budelpack has appointed MERILYN MURPHY as project manager to provide an interface between customers and all different departments within the company. Murphy is a graduate engineer with over 10 years’ experience in development engineering, lecturing and contract project management.Kluman & Balter is committing itself to 25% growth in the next three years. DANNY KLUMAN is the new managing director, SIMON DOUGLAS takes over in-house sales and Jamie Kluman is in charge of field sales. Meanwhile, former MD GEOFF KLUMAN becomes chairman. British food and drink market development consultancy Food from Britain has expanded its client development team with the appointment of RICHARD SAINTER as client development account manager. Sainter will look after the West and East Midlands, east of England and north and east London, meeting suppliers and manufacturers and discussing export opportunities, potential research projects and the chance to exhibit at the British Pavilion. He will also act as business development consultant to local businesses.last_img read more

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All from scratch

first_imgAmidst the cacophony of healthy-eating messages and manufacturers scrambling to put a healthy spin on their products, it’s refreshing to hear one organic baker proudly declaring her cakes as ’unhealthy’.”Six years ago, you either had good cakes that were not organic, or you had organic cake that was a compromise in taste. It wasn’t easy to find organic products that tasted really nice and were sinful, or unhealthy!” says Danish-born Lise Madsen of organic cake specialist Honeyrose Bakery.Originally conceived for retail in 2001, the firm’s handmade cakes are increasingly selling into cafés, coffee shops and business catering in and around London, in both unwrapped and individually pre-packed form. Turning over £1.4m, the next step will be taking the business up to £3m-£5m, although the imminent arrival of Madsen’s second baby is an understandably more pressing priority.”There’s a limited amount of time I can put into growing the business, so we’re taking on two sales managers; but we’ve grown slowly and steadily and it’s meant we don’t have any financial pressures and no loans in the business,” says Madsen. In fact, she claims the firm is “cash rich” and on the look-out for new premises, having outgrown the current facility in Park Royal, London.She firmly advocates craft skills over automation and scratch baking over premixes. “Having worked at [confectionery and delicatessen specialist] Lenôtre in Paris, within a production centre employing 500 people doing everything by hand, I know it’s not because you become big that you have to start using machines; it’s just a matter of repeating a process and keeping the skills,” she says.Madsen harboured the dream of becoming a pastry chef from the age of 12 and eventually trained at Lenôtre for five years, achieving a degree in patisserie. Following a stint in Germany, she moved to London. “I had moved out of hands-on baking and into management,” she recalls. Madsen then project-managed a restaurant in the City for the Roux Brothers before starting her own business.The firm’s new gluten-free products were also developed with indulgence in mind and include a Bramley apple and sultana muffin, an orange, apricot and almond muffin, an exotic fruit muffin, a brownie with walnuts, an orange almond cake and a blueberry polenta cake. “It took us a very long time to develop gluten-free products, as I didn’t want to make them unless my conventional consumers would be equally happy to eat them,” she says.Honeyrose supplies some own-label and the brand will be launching into London Waitrose stores this month with a range of eight grab-and-go individually sliced cakes. But as far as buddying up with the multiples goes, that’s the end of it. “I like Waitrose because of the way they treat the supplier. I have a bit of a grudge against the other supermarkets because they’ve driven everything on price; there is no money for the skill and, one day, that is going to come back and bite us.”In line with her ethical approach, Honeyrose contributes 5% of profits to its own charitable foundation, funding Third World projects, including setting up bakeries in Malawi. nlast_img read more

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Alex Waugh, director general of the National Association of British and Irish Millers

first_imgIt has certainly been a newsworthy couple of months in wheat markets, with prices reaching record levels in September.The markets have also been characterised by volatility, especially in futures markets depending on weather reports and the activities of investment funds. We can expect more of the same in coming weeks. However, it is now in some senses academic – with growers having sold an estimated 80% of their wheat, high prices are locked into the system.Meanwhile, there are concerns about some aspects of the quality of this year’s UK crop. Certainly there is more variability in grain specific weight and lower Hagberg falling numbers than last year, but these are relatively minor issues. Of greater concern is the level of protein, which appears to be lower than last year, and more importantly its quality. Millers and bakers have been working hard to overcome the resulting difficulties in managing the transition from old crop to new. However, it is not always simple and costly grist adjustments have been required in some cases.At this stage, we do not know why this quality issue has arisen. The popular view is that it is linked to the extreme conditions experienced this year with drought in April and May followed by a miserable summer. Perhaps this affected the ability of growing plants to capture nitrogen and lay down quality protein.In summary, it is a more complicated crop than we have recently experienced in terms of quality, availability and price.last_img read more

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Sour dough

first_imgA restaurant heist turned sour, when bungling robbers mistook a $5 bag of bread rolls for a $30,000 swag bag. Donna Hayes and Benjamin Jorgensen were sent down after the failed robbery at the Cuckoo Restaurant in Melbourne, Australia, last year. The raid, which fittingly took place on April Fool’s Day, saw Jorgensen point a sawn-off shotgun at the manager and demand he hand over the bag he was carrying at the end of his shift. Aware of the contents, the manager thought it was a joke and tried explaining this to Jorgensen. Victorian County Court judge Roland Williams – generously we think – branded them a “pair of fools” and respectively jailed them for eight and seven years.last_img read more

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Bakery to benefit from huge Tameside spend

first_imgThe £90 million rebuilding of Tameside College will herald an exciting period of growth for the bakery department, with more students, even better equipment and closer links with schools and employers, said head of food and hospitality studies Chris Massey.He told British Baker that the bakery facilities had only recently been enhanced, with £60,000 of investment in state-of-the-art bread and roll plants. But with the rebuild, to be completed by 2012, he said he planned to make a bid for a further £50,000 of new equipment.Emphasising the importance of the college’s concentration on craft bakery, he said: “We will have a say in what we have and what we want. We will talk to the industry to make sure what we are doing meets their requirements, as it is important that we create pathways to employment in the bakery industry.”While other bakery departments, such as the one at Oldham College, had closed down in the north west, Massey said Tameside was poised for “significant expansion”, thanks to strong support from the principal John Carroll and college governors.He added: “Colleges tend to shrink when they are rebuilt, but we will not. I know that my department will not be subject to cost-cutting, but will undergo substantial growth.” He anticipated an increase in the number of students of 15-20% over the next year.A key element of the expansion will be a new bakery, which will sell products to the general public through a shop on Stanford Street. The college will also hear soon whether it has been successful in winning its bid to host the national bakery skills academy, which Massey said had been lodged last year with the help of the food and drink sector skills council Improve.He said the space for the bakery department would be roughly the same, with an additional area for product development and, possibly, consultancy.last_img read more

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’Real’ bread campaign starts

first_imgThousands of people have pledged their support to Sustain’s Real Bread Campaign, which promotes bread that is made without additives and has been fermented for at least four hours.The brainchild of author and baker Andrew Whitley, the campaign officially launched on 26 November, with a website featuring a ’real’ bread finder, to help consumers look up UK bakeries and retailers making and selling ’real’ bread. Over 2,000 people had signed up to the campaign before the official launch.’Real’ bread is defined as bread that has been made with flour, water, yeast and salt (optional), no additives, and has been fermented for at least four hours. Bread made only with refined white flour does not qualify. See www. sustainweb.org/realbread.last_img read more

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National Trust to launch bakery lines

first_imgThe National Trust is to launch its first branded bakery range in early 2010, and is on the look-out for bakeries to get involved.The bakery range, which will sit alongside a wider branded food and drink line, will consist of three breads and five biscuit varieties, inspired by the Trust’s own produce and from traditional recipes held in its archive.The development of the bakery range has been licensed to Rivermill, a food licensing and sales agency specialist, and MD Andrew Chesters told British Baker he was keen to hear from firms interested in producing products for the range. Breads on offer will be a National Trust Stoneground Wholemeal Loaf, Milk Loaf and Barm Bread, part of a wider range of bakery goods from Rivermill. The biscuit range will comprise Stem Ginger and Orange Marma-lade, Clotted Cream Rounds, Lancashire Lemon Curds, Golden Honey Oaties and Oat Crumbles.Interested parties can contact [email protected] or call 0207 025 8718.last_img read more

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Fabulous Baker Brothers on C4 tonight

first_imgTom Herbert of Hobbs House Bakery and his brother Henry will appear in new Channel 4 series tonight (4 January) at 8.30pm called The Fabulous Baker Brothers.The series consists of six 30-minute programmes that aim to “unlock the trade secrets of baking, and without a cupcake in sight”, taking viewers into the heat of an artisan kitchen.Tom, a baker, and Henry, a chef who runs the local butcher’s shop next door, have five generations of baking tradition behind them.The first episode will feature a recipe to make the perfect white loaf, a unique chocolate ’sticky stick’ donuts creation and a weekly head-to-head where the brothers will take part in a pie-making competition judged by a group of farmers.last_img read more

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Warning about pet adoption scams amid the pandemic

first_img Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Twitter CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Pinterest Pinterest (“Scared” by Eric.Ray, CC BY 2.0) MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. — Many have been adopting cats and dogs during the coronavirus pandemic, but Michigan City Police want you to be aware of a potential scam if you’re trying to find a furry friend.Scammers nationwide are targeting people looking for a pet to adopt, and while police in Michigan City say there hasn’t been a local case they want people to be aware.Vice President of Pet Refuge, Nancy Whiteman, told WSBT scammers have been reeling people in with fake adoption websites or social media pages with cute pictures of dogs and cats for sale.Scammers have been reeling people in with fake adoption websites or social media pages with cute pictures of dogs and cats for sale.Michigan City Police Sgt. Franciso Rodriquez told WSBT that the accounts will communicate with you and respond like a normal seller, but they’ll ask for fees like charges for vaccinations and “COVID-safe” shipping.Then they’ll call and say the animal is stuck somewhere and to get the shipping to continue you’ll have to pay more.Whiteman says most shelters have a checklist to ensure the animal and human are compatible. During the pandemic, potential adopters have to fill out an application and be screened before setting up an appointed.They warn not to do everything online, and don’t pay before you see the dog or cat. Warning about pet adoption scams amid the pandemic WhatsApp By Network Indiana – May 10, 2020 0 484 Facebook Previous articleExpired Indiana drivers licenses, registrations now valid through June 4Next articleThree Oaks woman seriously injured in crash in Weesaw Township Network Indianalast_img read more

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Indiana State Prison offenders make masks, deep clean amid pandemic

first_img Pinterest Indiana State Prison offenders make masks, deep clean amid pandemic Previous articleNew Michigan grants, loans available to small businesses and entrepreneursNext articleNotre Dame Stadium not likely at full capacity for 2020 season Brooklyne Beatty Facebook Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Facebook WhatsApp Google+center_img Google+ By Brooklyne Beatty – May 13, 2020 1 390 Twitter (Photo Supplied/Indiana State Prison) The Indiana State Prison is taking several precautions to avoid the spread of coronavirus at the facility.In a release sent Tuesday, the prison detailed the many protocols in place to protect the well-being of both employees and offenders.Currently, all staff must:Wear a face mask;Practice social distancing;Pass a symptom screening questionnaire;Pass a temperature check.There are also signs at the front entrance reminding staff, “If sick, stay home,” and signs throughout the facility reminding everyone to wash their hands, cough into their elbows and maintain 6-foot social distancing.In an effort to help, offenders have been making masks for both staff and offenders to wear. Currently, masks have been distributed to every staff member and offender on grounds. In a few short weeks, offender seamstresses have made more than 4,000 masks.The prison has also established sanitation crews, which have pressure washed all of the housing units with bleach water, scrubbed all common areas and continue to disinfect daily.Daily temperature and symptom screenings are being conducted on quarantined housing units, as well as on offenders who are over 65 years of age. A designated isolation area has been set up for offenders who are symptomatic. TAGScoronavirusCOVID-19face masksindiana state prisonmasksoffenderspandemicprotocols WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

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