Month: January 2021

Locals discuss ND neighbors

first_img “I suppose neighbors probably think it is their right to call if the students are being loud,” he said.  Shirley McFarland, a local resident, said she felt some of the arrests might have been unwarranted. Good Neighbor Guides, distributed to off-campus students at the beginning of the year, suggest communicating with neighbors about upcoming parties and giving them contact information. Miller said while communication is helpful, parties need to be contained. “I think the students are great in helping the community,” Miller said. “If you’ve got a problem you need to talk to the people involved.” South Bend resident and Notre Dame 1964 alumnus Ben Cashman said student and community relations improved along with an increase in student outreach. “I think some of them could have been avoided,” she said. “I have phone numbers for the students so I would call them first.” “Most of the students are well-intentioned and respectful,” Miller said. MacFarland said student volunteers at the Robinson Community Learning Center helped her son and other local children with after-school programming. The fraternities, sororities and off-campus houses that line the streets of cities like Bloomington and Dayton are no where to be found on Notre Dame Avenue, Eddy Street or Angela Boulevard.  South Bend is not a college town. “I think the students are quite involved, I see pictures in the paper of them volunteering downtown,” Carter said.  “It’s just not acceptable to be having big keg parties. It’s a recipe for trouble,” he said. “Years ago, when my husband first died, I thought I was going to have to move out of the neighborhood,” she said. “I would come home from work and 200 kids would be across the street, two cars would be parked in my driveway, and when I asked them to move they drove through my yard. That was the worst time.” “[Students should] continue to be involved at the Robinson Community Learning Center, because they have a lot of kids there who have no help in the afternoons.” McFarland moved into her house on Notre Dame Avenue in 1984. She said students back then were often problematic residents. Some residents said they saw the University’s involvement in the construction of Eddy Street Commons as another positive way for Notre Dame to contribute to the community at an administrative level. Tensions rose when a spike in arrests occurred earlier in the semester, but cooled, and arrests declined. Miller said he felt the student presence in the neighborhood to be largely positive. Miller said individual students could help maintain good relations with the community by continuing to be active in South Bend and maintaining open lines of communication with neighbors. She said since the 1980s, students in her neighborhood have become significantly more considerate. A South Bend resident of 68 years, Deacon Brian Miller said he felt students needed to understand the stereotypical Animal House college lifestyle does not fit the family neighborhoods of South Bend. “Students do a lot of volunteer work, so that has helped relationships,” he said. “There was not much involvement with South Bend in my student days. We did not have chances to get involved with non-profits like the Logan Center or the homeless center.” “I think the rest of South Bend is getting let go and getting pretty rotten,” he said. “[Students should be] just trying to keep the neighborhood halfway decent.” “After that, it got better, once the police started talking to them,” she said. “Most of the time I don’t even know when people are over there.” In addition to forming relationships with their immediate neighbors, residents said student involvement in the community was also crucial to maintaining positive relations.  But South Bend resident Jim Carter considers calling police to be a reasonable response if a situation warrants it. Tensions sometimes do arise from a discrepancy between students’ expectations of college town freedoms and local families’ expectations for quiet neighborhoods. He said some parts of the city are on the decline and need help from students. “The students, they need to try to be respectful neighbors. If they have a party they need to make sure there are parameters,” he said.  “I’m over there a lot, to me I think it’s growth for the neighborhood,” McFarland said. “It brings business, it’s something for the community to look forward to, and people off campus can get jobs.”last_img read more

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Group discusses sustainability strategy

first_imgMembers of the Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed how to best meet goals set by the comprehensive Sustainability Strategy and 2030 Challenge in their meeting Monday.  Student body president Pat McCormick said student government’s plan focuses on conserving resources, reducing emissions by 50 percent per gross square foot by 2030 and increasing awareness of the connection between sustainability and Notre Dame’s mission.  “It is of note to recognize [University President] Fr. Jenkins for signing the St. Francis pledge [Nov. 30], which focuses on the adaption of poor populations and climate change,” McCormick said. “We want to go from setting these goals to implementing them, given their connections to Catholic teaching.” Dr. Rachel Novick, education and outreach program manager for the Office of Sustainability, said the Green Summit V will be the next big event on campus to promote sustainability. “This year’s theme is transportation and it will be held in Stepan Center so we can bring in electric and alternative fuel vehicles, as well as other exhibits,” she said. “It will be on [Feb. 29] over lunch.”  Members of the CLC also discussed how sustainability practices in dorms and classroom buildings can work to reduce waste. Sr. Mary Donnelly, rector of Pangborn Hall, said hydration stations located in dorms could lessen the number of plastic bottles used on campus. “We use a lot of plastic water bottles because the water tastes terrible,” Donnelly said. “The hall president asked if we could get [a hydration station] to provide filtered water.” Novick said the University Architect’s Office fully integrated this idea into its designs since it has begun renovating dorms. Four dorms have these stations now, she said. “We need to move faster than that, but we need to find out how to fund it,” she said. “With each installation, it’s a couple thousand dollars. It’s especially a priority for DeBartolo Hall as a main classroom building.” The other route to waste reduction in dorms includes recycling and purchasing energy star appliances, McCormick said. Donnelly said providing larger recycling bins would encourage more students to think about what they throw away. “The recycle bin is smaller than the trash bin. Can it be flipped?” she said. “The visual cue would help.” Novick said these and other concerns can be reported to the Office of Sustainability on its website. “There are places on campus that need to be fixed, like rooms with lights but no switch, or a radiator that won’t turn off,” she said. “We find someone who can address it.” Novick said the best way to solve the sustainability issue on campus is to change campus culture. “Do you just walk away and leave lights on? We need to change it so that we say we prioritize this and will take the extra time,” she said.last_img read more

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Notre Dame receives 2014 Honor Roll Award for service

first_imgThe Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) awarded Notre Dame a spot on the 2014 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.Director of Community Engagement for the Office of Public Affairs Jay Caponigro said the honor roll recognizes the University’s commitment to three categories: community service, education and economic development.“Each year, colleges and universities are invited to share stories about their engagement in the community,” Caponigro said. “Unique to this year’s application, ND was recognized in all three categories where we applied.”According to the CNCS, the presidential award is presented to institutions that “support exemplary community service programs and raise the visibility of effective practices in campus community partnerships.”Although Notre Dame has received honor distinctions in the community service category in the past, Caponigro said this is the first year the University applied and received recognition for the categories of education and economic development.“Notre Dame has been recognized as ‘Honor Roll’ recipient or ‘Honor Roll with Distinction’ or ‘Honor Roll Finalist’ for five of the six years this award has been given,” he said.Due to the University’s interest and subsequent participation in both national and international endeavors, Caponigro said Notre Dame is constantly expanding its education and development programs.“I believe Notre Dame received this recognition because we demonstrated breadth of student and faculty involvement, an infrastructure to support community-based activities and the institutional commitment to engagement that mutually impacts community and campus participants,” he said.The University’s 2014 application featured numerous examples of student, faculty and staff engagement in the community, Caponigro said. Although the majority of students partake in some form of service, the director of community engagement said service is less about the number of people involved and more about the impact and mutual benefits that impact both volunteers and the community at large.Caponigro said key areas of involvement for the 2014 year included work in youth theater and entrepreneurship at the Robinson Community Learning Center as well as academic support and tutoring at non-profits.Local schools were widely supported, and broad volunteer service also occurred as a result of efforts conducted through CommUniversity Day, Caponigro said. Additionally, community development partnerships were fostered with the Northeast Neighborhood, a neighborhood association in South Bend.“Our office joins with many departments and staff across campus to invite students to continue to engage the community in meaningful partnerships and service opportunities,” he said. “We welcome innovative student-leaders hoping to create new projects in the community as well as support long-standing efforts with community partners that demonstrate impact year after year.”Tags: CommUniversity Day, Jay Caponigrolast_img read more

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Group celebrates Pi Day with 5k race

first_imgThe Society of Schmitt Fellows and the Notre Dame chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) will celebrate this year’s Pi Day – the date in correspondence to the decimal approximation of the number pi – by hosting the first Pi Day 5K run on Notre Dame’s campus.The run will begin at 9:26 a.m. the morning of March 14, and together, the race date and time constitute the first eight digits of pi: 3.1415926.Vice President of AWIS and co-organizer of the event Claire Bowen said proceeds from the run will benefit the Harrison Boys and Girls Club’s Girls on the Run program, which according to the program website encourages girls “to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experienced-based curriculum which creatively integrates running.”Bowen said her previous experience volunteering as a coach for Girls on the Run motivated the decision to use the race as a fundraiser for the program.“I was very affected by the girls there, because most of them had nowhere to go,” she said.  “Literally the Boys and Girls Club was a sanctuary for them, because a lot of times their parents or guardians couldn’t pick them up until six or seven o’clock at night.”Graduate student Alicia Specht, another coordinator of the event, said she thinks the Girls on the Run program is valuable because it empowers girls in challenging situations.She said she and her fellow organizers relate to the girls of the program because of the gender inequality they’ve experienced as women in field of science.“It’s a program that’s very near and dear to all of our hearts just based on the kind of adversity that we’ve all faced,” she said.The other major purpose of the race is to engage the community, graduate student event co-organizer Kelsey DiPietro said.  She said a variety of interactive events, all with some connection to the race’s Pi Day theme, will follow the race.“It’s not only a run, but afterwards there will be hands on science experiments, laboratory tours, to really encourage the community – especially young people, both men and women – to see science at a university setting,” she said.DiPietro said each registered contestant will receive a slice of pie in the spirit of the day, and additional pie will be available for purchase by spectators.  She said there will even be a competition to recite the digits of pi, the winner of which will receive a prize.Specht said she hopes the Pi Day festivities will become a Notre Dame tradition that encourages an appreciation for science in the community.“I guess it’s something that’s kind of evolved over the past few years in a lot of high schools and middle schools, this celebration of Pi Day,” Specht said.  “It’s a way to get kids excited about math while eating delicious things.”Race participants have the option of registering for a 5K, a 10K, or a one mile walk, DiPietro said.  She said anyone interested in competing will be able to register online at awis.nd.edu/piday5k until the morning of the race.last_img read more

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University names director for academic diversity and inclusion

first_imgThe University selected Pamela Nolan Young to fill the new position for director of academic diversity and inclusion, according to an April 7 press release.Young, a graduate of Notre Dame Law School, will join the University’s Provost Staff and focus mainly on enhancing Notre Dame’s faculty climate while also coordinating diversity and inclusion within the academic sphere, the release said.“The desire to bring together diverse voices and perspectives is at the heart of what Notre Dame stands for,” Thomas G. Burish, the University’s Charles and Jill Fischer Provost, said in the release. “I am so pleased to welcome Pamela back to Notre Dame to lead us in this mission-critical area and to ensure we are both purposeful and effective in the ways we seek to foster an environment where all may flourish.”Prior to filling this new position, Young worked as the director of institutional diversity and equity at Smith College. She also worked for North Shore Community College for five years as their human resources director. At both schools, Young managed affirmative action plans and maintained diversity policies and events.“A prominent presenter on issues of equality, diversity and inclusion, Young has served in various community leadership roles, including as a member of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education Multicultural Affairs Think Tank and on boards for organizations involved with cultural enrichment, educational advancement, abused women and children, food pantries and housing discrimination,” the release stated.Tags: Diversity and Inclusion, Pamela Young, Provost Office, Tom Burishlast_img read more

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Author discusses storytelling, violence against black women

first_imgDanielle McGuire, author of ‘At the Dark End of the Street,’ spoke at Saint Mary’s on Thursday night about the power of historical storytelling. McGuire said her research into the stories and narratives of the Civil Rights Movement led her discover a common thread of sexually-motivated violence against black women. “What I found was that even the most oft-told and illustrious civil rights stories all had an unexamined history of gendered political appeals to protect black women from sexualized violence,” she said. “But I think as historians, we have missed these stories because we have not listened carefully enough to black women’s testimonies. We didn’t think of racialized violence, that was also sexualized, as a civil rights issue.”McGuire said these stories are often overlooked because people have a tendency to ignore information that challenges their beliefs. “We tend to ignore evidence that doesn’t fit into the broad outlines of what we think we already know, even though as scholars, we’re trained to question,” she said. In 1998, McGuire listened to a radio show where the host discussed a key figure in the civil rights movement: Gertrude Perkins. Having no idea who she was, McGuire began to research Perkins’ life. “She was a 25-year-old African American woman who was walking alone from a party in March of 1949, when two white Montgomery police officers kidnapped her off the street, arrested her for public drunkenness, and instead of taking her to jail for her arrest, drove her to a dark railroad embankment and raped her repeatedly,” she said. “Somehow, she managed to get home … the police, of course, refused to help, they accused her of lying and the mayor denied all charges, saying, ‘my policemen wouldn’t do a thing like that.’ But African Americans in Montgomery knew better. They knew what happened to Gertrude Perkins wasn’t at all unusual.”McGuire said African Americans in Montgomery organized themselves and rallied behind Perkins. “They formed an umbrella organization called ‘The Citizens Committee for Gertrude Perkins’ and demanded an investigation and a trial,” she said. “Their public protests lasted for more than two months, and that had never happened before. Their protests put the story on the front pages of the white newspapers in town. Those protests enabled the black [community] to expose the longstanding practices of white police officers who had been attacking black women regularly … They created an activist infrastructure that they used again and again and again.”After researching Perkins’s narrative, McGuire left the story alone. However, attending graduate courses and reading new literature renewed her interest in the subject, McGuire explained.  “What I saw now, having taken those courses and read widely, was bold testimony about rape and community mobilization about the issue of sexualized and racialized violence,”she said. “I saw organized activism for the right to bodily integrity. I saw sexual violence as a civil rights issue, something none of the civil rights books at the time even mentioned.”The assault on Gertrude Perkins was not an anomaly, McGuire said.  “I thought in a new way,” she said. “Maybe the assault on Gertrude Perkins was not unique. I wondered, people had mobilized pretty quickly. Their outrage and anger at police was not rooted in naivete or inexperience, it was seasoned. It was simmering.” McGuire noted that assaults on black women in the 1940’s initiated protests and campaigns for human dignity. “There had been a series of sexual assaults on black women by white men in and around Montgomery in the 1940’s,” she said. “Each time that happened, black women’s testimony sparked campaigns for human dignity and bodily integrity and those campaigns were almost always organized and led by the exact same people: E.D. Nixon, Jo Ann Robinson, Rufus Lewis and Rosa Parks.” These protests grew as more testimonies from black women came in, including stories from those who regularly used public transport, McGuire said. “There were first hand accounts from working class black women who used the buses,” she said. “The majority of riders on the Montgomery line were black women — working class black women, domestics. For them, the buses were sites of violence.”Incident reports at the time show bus drivers assaulting or sexually harassing black women, with no assistance from the police who often participated in the violence. “Reading these reports, and thinking differently about Gertrude Perkins’s story, made the narrative of the Montgomery bus boycott really different from the one I thought I knew so well,” she said. “Looking at it through intersectional lenses taught me that the bus boycott was definitely about racial segregation, but also about gendered, and sexually violence and it had a particular impact on working class black women.”For McGuire, understanding the true historical narrative provided necessary historical context that helped her to comprehend the Montgomery Bus Boycott as well as the underlying current of sexual violence that affected so many working class black women during the era. “Once I knew that story, I realized that it was almost impossible to understand and situate the boycott in its proper historical context without understanding the story of Gertrude Perkins and all the other women who were assaulted and harassed in and around Montgomery,”she said. “Without that context, it was impossible to understand why so many thousands of working class black women put their bodies on the line to protest the buses. This story was there all along.” McGuire couples this story with that of Recy Taylor, an African American woman who was gangraped at gunpoint by white men in 1944; McGuire said that Taylor’s assault was another key component of the Civil Rights Movement narrative. “A couple of days later she got a call from the NAACP, and they promised to send their very best investigator: her name was Rosa Parks,” she said. “Rosa Parks arrived on Recy Taylor’s doorstep with a notebook and a pen, with great risk to her own life and to that of Taylor and her own family, and she listened to Taylor tell her what happened … She and the city’s most militant activists formed the Committee for Equal Justice for Mrs. Recy Taylor … This was a huge movement, decades before #MeToo, before the personal was political, before women took back the night.”McGuire met Recy Taylor in 2009, the same day millions of Americans gathered to watch the inauguration of the first black president. “I asked Mrs. Taylor if she ever believed an African-American woman would become first lady. ‘Not in my lifetime,’ she said.” Taylor’s past is one plagued by inhumane treatment of black women, McGuire said.“Growing up in the Jim Crow south, Taylor knew that black women weren’t even considered ladies,” she said. “From slavery through the bulk of the 20th century, white people denied black women the most basic citizenship and human rights, especially the right to ownership and control over their own bodies.” Contextualizing the stories of Recy Taylor, Gertrude Perkins and all the other black women assaulted and harassed in the twentieth century can help people rally behind the women who continue to be victims of this kind of assault today, McGuire said. “Telling stories about the past only matter if we can contextualize them,” she said. “This story about Recy Taylor helps us to see the women like her who remain at the margins, and as a result of that, remain the most vulnerable to sexual harassment, violence and rape. Until we can see them the same way we see A-list actresses, or Olympic athletes, none of us will be free from the scourge of sexual violence.”Telling the stories of women of color and marginalized women can impact our present and our future, McGuire explained.“If we’re going to make history matter within a society where an iPhone 5 is already an ancient artifact, where people prefer to tweet or Instagram rather than read books, then we really have to think about how to make ordinary people care about a past that has an enormous influence on our present,” she said. “One of the ways to do this, is to tell really good stories. We have to write something that ordinary people actually want to read, something that speaks to them about their experiences and about their lives.” Students have an obligation to read and think deeply, McGuire said. They should also aim to look at the past, present and future with new eyes. “It’s your job as budding scholars and storytellers to make the past come to life, to make the dead past live again and to perform a resurrection,” she said. “Your job is to read deeply, to rethink old narratives and to look at the past and the present with new eyes, eyes that can see intersectional oppression.” Tags: Civil Rights Movement, Danielle McGuire, history, sexual assaultlast_img read more

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Buffalo Diocese Seeks Halt To Outstanding Sex Abuse Lawsuits

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: US Air Force / PixabayBUFFALO — The Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo has taken legal action seeking to stop all outstanding clergy sexual abuse lawsuits while it navigates bankruptcy proceedings in federal court.The diocese filed a motion in federal bankruptcy court on Saturday seeking an injunction on lawsuits filed under New York’s Child Victims Act. About 250 lawsuits have been filed against the diocese since August, when the act gave victims one year to pursue even decades-old allegations of abuse.Lawsuits against the diocese were moved to bankruptcy court in February and permanently frozen, but the bankruptcy filing only temporarily halted lawsuits against individual parishes or Catholic schools. Those cases could be moved back into state supreme court unless the diocese is granted a permanent injunction.“Pausing litigation will allow for all parties to engage in settlement negotiations in the context of the diocese’s Chapter 11 case and to attempt to reach a global resolution of all claims (including claims against parishes and schools), without the distraction of piecemeal litigation,” the diocese said in a statement Monday. The diocese said continued litigation would deplete its insurance reserves and reduce future settlements to survivors.But lawyers representing abuse survivors said the injunction is designed to keep their clients from having their day in court, prevent access to priest personnel records and allow parishes and schools to protect their financial assets.“This legal maneuver by the Diocese of Buffalo is just another example of the Catholic Church coldly putting its needs before the needs of victims,” said Boston attorney Mitchell Garabedian, who represents 39 clients suing the diocese. He said a hearing on the injunction is set for May 20.“This is a very aggressive move,” Buffalo attorney Steven Boyd said Monday. “We feel it is an unnecessary move because we’ve been negotiating with them in good faith.”The diocese previously announced it would cease financial support and health benefits for 23 priests with substantiated allegations of sexual abuse beginning May 1 as part of the bankruptcy process. None were in active ministry.last_img read more

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A Sixth Tony for Audra? McDonald to Sing the Blues as Billie Holiday on Broadway

first_imgLady is gonna sing the blues! Before her rumored role opposite Oprah, five-time Tony winner Audra McDonald is prepping to return to the Great White Way this season as Billie Holiday in Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill. Although no official announcement has been made, Broadway.com has learned the play is expected to play at the Circle in the Square Theatre, which will be vacated by Bronx Bombers on March 2. One of Broadway’s top stars, McDonald has won Tony Awards in the categories of Best Leading Actress in a Musical (Porgy and Bess), Best Featured Actress in a Musical (Ragtime, Carousel) and Best Featured Actress in a Play (A Raisin in the Sun, Master Class). Since Lady Day is typically billed as a play with music, this engagement could give her the opportunity to round out her wins with a trophy in the category of Best Leading Actress in a Play. A sixth win would make Audra the most honored actress in Broadway history! Lanie Robertson’s bio-show about Holiday debuted off-Broadway in 1986 starring Lonette McKee and has been produced around the country and internationally ever since. Tony and Grammy winner Dee Dee Bridgewater starred in a production of Lady Day off-Broadway which closed earlier this year. A full evening of McDonald singing the blues? Consider us jazzed. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 5, 2014 Related Shows Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill Star Files Audra McDonaldlast_img read more

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Tony Nominations for Everyone! Award Honchos Expand Show Categories

first_img View Comments Every year, the Broadway.com editorial staff spends hours making charts, graphs and dartboards to try to figure out which four musicals will be honored with a “Best Musical” nomination for the Tony Awards. Wait, what? Five musicals?! Sadly, there will still only be one winner per category. Sorry producers. At this time, twelve new musicals have either opened or are scheduled to open during the 2013-2014 season on Broadway, which means you can probably expect to hear five Best Musical nominees when this year’s crop is announced on April 29. There are also more than a dozen play revivals in the season, so that category could also be expanded. Suddenly, yes. According to Variety, the Tony Awards administration committee quietly voted last month to allow the number of nominees in the Best Musical, Best Play, Best Musical Revival and Best Play Revival categories to five rather than the traditional four nominees if there are nine or more eligible shows to choose between. On the flip side, if less than nine possible shows exist in a category, the number of nominees could be reduced to three.last_img read more

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Watch Shia LaBeouf Explain His Eventful Night at B’way’s Cabaret

first_img Cabaret Related Shows Shia LaBeouf stopped by Jimmy Kimmel Live on October 13 and revealed to the host exactly what went down at his eventful night out at Broadway’ Cabaret in June. Oozing humility—and humor— the star described how it all started with a trip to Ireland, followed by a viewing of the World Cup in the Big Apple, before he even ended up at Studio 54. Where between eating fruit, smoking and grabbing Allen Iverson’s (you read that right) butt cheeks with a “Hercules” grip, he landed in jail. At which point LaBeouf said he turned “into Tupac.” The sorry tale ends with a McDonalds egg sandwich and a promise to stay clear of Broadway “for a little bit.” Watch below to see the unpretentious LaBeouf explain himself below—we wish him well with his treatment for alcohol addiction and recovery. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 29, 2015 View Commentslast_img read more

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