Month: July 2019

Most mental health serviceusers are still deeply

first_imgMost mental health service-users are still deeply divided about identifying with the social model of disability, but still favour moving away from the medicalised attitude of professionals and towards a more “social” approach, according to a new report.The user-led research aimed to investigate how a more “social” approach to thinking about mental distress could be developed, in the face of the traditional medical model that dominates the views of both the public and professionals.Most of the service-users interviewed for the report said they believe that the medical model approach leads to an “over-emphasis on drug treatments”, and is “stigmatising and damaging”.Although the government has pledged to secure “parity of esteem” for mental health with physical healthcare, there is concern at a growing crisis in services, an increasing use of compulsory treatment, a large number of service-users in prison, a low number with jobs, and “continuing high levels of suicide and self-harm”, the report says.The report says that the big mental health charities like Mind, Rethink and the Mental Health Foundation (MHF) need to look “much more critically” at their insistence on sticking to “medical understandings of mental distress which many service users ?nd damaging and unhelpful”.It also says that mental health system survivors interviewed for the research gave a “very mixed response” to the anti-stigma campaigns like Time to Change, which have secured “major public and political interest”.The report, From Mental Illness To A Social Model Of Madness And Distress, was funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, and was published this week by two service-user organisations, Shaping Our Lives (SOL) and the National Survivor User Network (NSUN).The report was written by four researchers with personal experience of the mental health system: Peter Beresford, Rebecca Perring, Mary Nettle and Jan Wallcraft.They conclude that “social approaches” are likely to have “massive traction with mental health service users/survivors, but not if they are narrowly based on the social model of disability”.Views on the social model – which argues that disability is caused by barriers in society – are still “polarised”, six years after the first stage of the research project concluded that “further discussions about more social approaches to mental health were needed”.Mental health system survivors are “particularly divided” about the social model idea that disabled people have an impairment that is separate to the disability they face. The report, launched at a joint NSUN and SoL event in Birmingham yesterday (8 June), says: “There is an irony in that disabled people developed the social model to escape from the prevailing medicalised individual model of disability, but for some survivors, the concept of impairment feels like a re-imposition of a medical model on them which treats their experience like a physical or chemical problem.”One survivor told researchers: “I wouldn’t accept that I have an impairment or a disability, because I feel that my problems are caused by childhood… and a dysfunctional family.“That doesn’t mean that I am now disabled, I think that’s a nonsense for me, it makes no sense.“But it does mean that I have mental health needs and that I can’t engage in the workplace in the way that other people can for various reasons.”But many survivors still believe it is “possible and helpful” to support the broader disabled people’s movement, while “retaining their own distinct identity as mental health service users”.One said: “I strongly agree, because so far all social justice work (which is a crucial part of the social model) has been undertaken by physical disability activists.“Mental health has been riding on its coat tails. I do identify as disabled.”One of the suggestions that came from participants in the research was that a bene?ts system based on a social approach would “reduce rather than reinforce stigma and the negative stereotyping of mental health service users and challenge rather than add to the hostility and discrimination they face”.They also highlighted the importance of moving towards a system which “values people experiencing distress and their potential contribution, for example, through voluntary work and community involvement”.One of the report’s recommendations is for “adequate and secure funding” for smaller, user-led organisations, which tend to encourage the involvement of service-users and “show a greater understanding” of social approaches to explaining mental distress.Beresford (pictured), SOL’s chair and emeritus professor of social policy at Brunel University, said he believed the research showed the need for survivors to be given opportunities to work together to reach an understanding about a new model.He said that psychiatric provision was still largely stuck in the past, with a “medicalised” approach.He said: “All the talk [from professionals] is, ‘We will get it cracked with bio-medical or related approaches’… and it ain’t working.“I still think the lesson of the last decade is we are on the wrong track and that is what people are saying here.“They do feel we need a much more social model and we need to move away from a narrow bio-medical one.”And he said that the big mental health charities like Mind, Rethink and MHF needed to think again about their own approaches.He said: “Mind has got close to government, for example in relation to policy formation.“All of those organisations are signed up effectively to a biomedical model of distress which people we have spoken to now on two occasions… say is inherently problematic.”last_img read more

read more

SAINTS Chairman Eamonn McManus wrote in the Manc

first_imgSAINTS Chairman, Eamonn McManus, wrote in the Manchester Evening News this week:Super League has entered an exciting new season in the best financial shape in its history. A well delivered and profitable World Cup has been followed with significant central sponsorships and a vastly improved long-term TV deal which pretty much ensures the solvency and competitiveness of all participating clubs for years to come – progress indeed.These major financial strides forward were complemented by a well-reasoned RFL policy review on long-term player investment. This recommended, firstly and critically, improved investment in club academies to be underpinned by a recommended salary cap exemption above a certain threshold for elite club-trained players. This necessarily encourages and incentivises club investment in our own British lads and, equally importantly, enables the future equivalents of Sam Tompkins, Sam Burgess and James Graham to be kept within Super League if clubs are able and prepared to spend this proposed exemption. A second stage of the proposal was adopt a more broadly based “marquee player” salary cap exemption – effectively aimed at recruiting the best talent from the already very well funded Australian NRL. In my opinion the first element of the policy review is a current and critical necessity; however, the second element is presently an unnecessary and impractical inflationary luxury which can only seriously be considered when we are able first to retain our own best British talent.I was therefore more than concerned when Super League clubs last week proposed to adopt only the marquee exemption but shelved the academy investment and home grown exemption proposals. It is the absolute reverse of what it should be. Sanity prevailed and the proposal was voted down. However, worryingly, the home-grown exemption was not even discussed; this must be re-tabled and adopted, and soonest.Super League now faces a very similar strategic challenge from the NRL and from rugby union as the Bundesliga faced from the English Premier League and the Spanish La Liga some years ago. They decided to retrench and prioritise invest in their own front yard. Bayern is now the club of choice for the world’s best players and managers, and Germany is again a favourite for the soccer World Cup. I am an unashamed English patriot and a proud rugby league fan. Our own national rugby league team and club sides can only ever achieve this same objective if we follow that most sensible of models, and we are now strongly positioned so to do.That said, St.Helens have excitingly been able to recruit two stars of the NRL for this season. Luke Walsh was voted in the top six NRL players in last year’s prestigious Dally M Awards and has already proven a major new attraction for Super League. Big Mose Mosoe is potentially one of the most destructive impact props in world rugby league and is due to be unveiled in our home game this week – lots to get very excited about and even without salary cap dispensations I’m glad to report!last_img read more

read more

SAINTS U19s continued their unbeaten start to the

first_imgSAINTS U19s continued their unbeaten start to the season with a hard fought win 32-6 in testing conditions in Wakefield on Saturday, writes Graham Henthorne.The foundations for the win were laid in the first half where due to some fabulous last tackle kicking options the Saints kept the home side pinned in the own half for much of the first period and getting repeat set after repeat set.Unfortunately one stray pass and defensive tackle led to the Wildcats taking the lead against the run of play running the ball in from halfway.Unfazed the Saints continued their policy of playing the game in the Wildcats 40 metre area and turning the screw.The policy came good on 20 minutes as Lewis Charnock scored to bring the Saints level. A great drive from Liam Cooper saw him stopped short but from the play the ball Charnock took two over by the posts.Five minutes later and the Wildcats were broken again as André Savelio sent more bodies sprawling on his blockbusting 40 metre drive but the ball was dropped at the play the ball and the Saints had to settle for a share of the points at the break.The punishing runs of the Saints big men Joe Ryan, Luke Thompson, Ross McCauley and Savelio allied to the intelligent kicking of Dave Hewitt, Danny Richardson and Charnock had meant countless turnovers for the Saints and seven more sets in possession than their hosts.This was bound to have a sapping effect on the energy levels of the Wildcats in the second period and the coaching staff called for more of the same and patience to wait until the Wildcats collapsed.The Saints got the dream start as big Ross McCauley got a deserved try as he plunged over after good work from Joe Ryan in yet another repeat set.Then came the patience as the home side again demonstrated their dogged defensive attributes keeping the Saints at bay until the hour mark.Inevitably, it seemed today, it was Charnock who dealt the killer blow breaking through the line after his own kick got a repeat set.Charnock and McCauley then set up the position for Matty Fleming to run an angle and put Dan Abram over in the corner.The Saints were in full flow then graphically illustrated as Morgan Knowles on his debut sprinted 50 metres to trap the full back in goal and gain the Saints more possession. Three tackles later and the human wrecking ball that is André Savelio ploughed his way over.The final nail was hammered in by Aaron Smith who, after five drives from the pack had walked the Saints downfield, spotted the gap out wide on the last and darted over in the corner from 10 metres out.Whilst there is still much to work on for the bigger tasks ahead this was a good performance built on the back of a commanding kicking game and big hitting defence which gave the opposition nowhere to go.Luke Thompson led the way before his withdrawal at half time and was backed up by solid displays from Liam Cooper and stand in prop Matty Fozard.Match Summary:Wakefield U19s:Tries: Jacob Ware.Goals: Max Jowitt.Saints U19s:Tries: Lewis Charnock 2, Aaron Smith, Ross McAuley, Dan Abram, André Savelio.Goals: Lewis Charnock 4.Half Time: 6-6 Full Time: 32-6Teams:Wakefield U19s:1. Max Jowitt; 2. Brandon Conway, 3. Kieran Holt, 4. Jacob Ware, 5. Declan Brereton; 6. Tom McGrattan, 7. Scott Lee; 8. Jack Teamby, 9. Brad Moles, 10. Fraser Morris, 11. Jordan Crowther, 12. Jack Walton, 13. Korbin Kildare. Subs: 14. Ben Cornell, 15. Callum Sampson, 16. Cam Leeming, 17. Danny Douglas.Saints U19s:1. Dan Abram; 2. David Eccleston, 4. Matty Fleming, 3. Jake Spedding, 5. Jordan Tisdale; 6. Danny Richardson, 7. Dave Hewitt; 8. Joe Ryan, 9. Matty Fozard, 15. Luke Thompson, 11. Liam Cooper, 12. Jack Ashworth, 13. Lewis Charnock. Subs: 14. Aaron Smith. 17. Ross McCauley, 18. Morgan Knowles, 20. André Savelio.last_img read more

read more

Saints face Wigan on Thursday 8pm at the Totally

first_imgSaints face Wigan on Thursday (8pm) at the Totally Wicked Stadium looking to secure only their second ‘back-to-back’ victory of the season.“I got here at a good time!” he said. “I was fortunate enough to get here in time for the Magic Weekend and I said after the game what a great concept I thought that was. It was a great weekend and then I roll into a local derby.“It is huge for both Saints and Wigan and I’m sure it will be a good game. They have got a good football team and Shaun (Wane) must be a good coach to have them firing the way they have. It’s well documented how many players they have out and that is probably why they are sitting where they are.“But this club wasn’t happy with where they were sitting and that’s why I am here. They expect to be near the top as they are a proud, successful club. We are working hard to climb up the ladder.“It has been easier to come into training after a win on Saturday. It is always more enjoyable after you have won. As the next couple of days roll around, we will get down to it because we know we are in for a tough game.“We came through ok. Jonny Lomax is one we would love to have back but I’m not sure if he will be able to make it on time. If he does it would be a great addition. If he runs out of time then I am happy with who we have got and how we ran at the weekend.“We did our review today and saw some areas we could improve in. The players bought into it and it gives me more reason to hope that the players can play better.”Justin says he hasn’t set any targets for the squad this season in terms of league position, focusing on improvement and performances in the first instance.“People say it is a cliché to take it week by week but being a new coach at the club it is the only choice,” he continued. “I have to try and change things a little bit and make sure we are in a better position as a team and a club.“If we play well; play like we did on Saturday then we will be in a good position. That is the challenge and we have to make sure we keep aiming up. Then we can string some wins together.”You can read more of Justin’s interview in this week’s programme, which is available on matchnight and priced at £3.Tickets for Thursday’s game remain on sale from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455 052 and online here.last_img read more

read more

Hundreds participate in second annual Womens March in Wilmington

first_img2018 Women’s March in Wilmington (Photo: Jenna Kurzyna/WWAY) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — WOW, Women Organizing for Wilmington hosted the anniversary of the Women’s March in Wilmington this Saturday as other groups gathered nationwide. Hundreds of woman and men showed up for the march.More than a dozen guest speakers were lined up to talk to the crowd of participants.People held signs and filled the streets in downtown to make their voices heard.- Advertisement – One of the organizers said this year was a little different than the previous march.“This year is different in that it’s not so much fueled by anger, although there is some of that, but it’s fueled more by a desire for change and so I’m going to say this year is more about voting,” WOW founding member Lynn Shoemaker said.The march started at 1 p.m. and lasted until 4 p.m.last_img read more

read more

Crews respond to Wilmington supermarket fire

first_imgScene of Everybody’s Supermarket fire, May 2, 2018. (Photo: Jenna Kurzyna) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Wilmington fire crews are on the scene of a fire near downtown Wilmington.New Hanover County Dispatch says they got the call at 7:16 p.m. about a fire at Everybody’s Supermarket in the 1000 block of Greenfield Street.- Advertisement – Flames could be seen coming from the roof, but Wilmington Police say there is no word yet on what started the fire.A Wilmington Police lieutenant says an officer just happened to see the fire, called it in, and got everyone out of the building.Just after 9 p.m., crews were still fighting the fire. The Wilmington Fire Department is investigating.last_img read more

read more

Sea turtle nest in Kure Beach disturbed again

first_imgSea turtle nest dug up a second time in Kure Beach. (Photo: Nancy Powell Busovne) KURE BEACH, NC (WWAY) — Pleasure Island Sea Turtle Project had an attempted poaching at one of the sea turtle nests on Kure Beach Friday morning, and now the person is unfortunately at it again.The organization posted another photo Saturday morning showing the nest dug out a second time.- Advertisement – Nancy Busovne of the sea turtle project says the eggs are still safe.Fines for digging up nests can reach up to $100,000 or a year in jail.If you ever see a turtle nest messed with on any beaches, contact the closest turtle rescue.Related Article: Could dredging impact sea turtle nesting season on Pleasure Island?To report dead, sick, or injured sea turtles on land or water anywhere in the state, call the NC Sea Turtle Hotline or look for the contact for each island in our viewing area.last_img read more

read more

Sheriffs office wants justice in Pender childs death

first_imgPaitin Fields (Photo: WWAY) PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — It’s been more than a year since a crime shocked a Pender County community and it still remains unsolved.On November 13, 2017, 5-year-old Paitin Fields was found unresponsive in her home. She died two days later.- Advertisement – An autopsy revealed the child had been sexually assaulted and strangled.Paitin lived with her grandmother in the Willard community at the time. Since her murder, there have been little answers.In June, the Pender County Sheriff’s Office announced they had a suspect in the case. Paitin’s 19-year-old uncle David Wesley Prevatte.Related Article: Police: Officer ran over pair lying in road to watch eclipsePrevatte was charged with intimidating a witness and communicating threats after allegedly threatening the life of the lead investigator in Paitin’s case.The sheriff’s office released an update Thursday, calling it a very active investigation.“From the beginning of this investigation we stated that we wanted to be able to determine the truth surrounding Paitin’s death, while protecting the integrity of our investigation in a manner that will allow the correct individual(s) to face charges and ultimately be convicted for the crimes they have committed,” the sheriff’s office stated in a news release. “This has not changed.”“We understand there are opinions circulating within and outside our community why no one has been charged in this case,” they added. “We continue to do everything possible to get justice for Paitin by keeping her case a priority so that her attacker may be brought to justice as soon as possible.”Deputies continue to work in conjunction with the Office of District Attorney Ben David.The following is a statement provided by his office concerning this investigation:“This case is very important to the District Attorney’s Office. Consistent with our police-prosecutor team approach, I have been apprised of the investigation since its early stages. The case remains under active investigation by the Pender County Sheriff’s Office, and they continue to follow all leads in the case. We have conducted a critical case review of this case with senior prosecutors in our office and other law enforcement agencies. We will continue to review all evidence as it comes to light. We encourage anyone with information regarding the death of Paitin Fields to contact the Pender County Sheriff’s Office.”If anyone with information to Paitin Fields case is asked to contact the Pender County Sheriff’s Office at (910) 259-1212.last_img read more

read more

Jones named CAA Player of the Year five seahawks named AllCAA

first_img Jones becomes the seventh Seahawk to earn the league’s player of the year award, which is named after longtime UNCW Director of Athletics and baseball coach Bill Brooks. Jones led the league in runs scored (62), triples (8), walks (48), on base average (.482) and was second in stolen bases (37) and fourth in slugging percentage (.540).Brown earned All-CAA honors for the first time while Weiss was a second-team selection in 2018 as a sophomore.Brown enters the CAA championships tournament leading the league with a career-high 52 runs batted in while hitting .279 with 14 doubles and a team-high seven home runs. The Charleston, S.C., native crafted a 20-game hitting streak this season, drove in runs in 10 consecutive games, a UNCW record, and recently saw his consecutive games reached safely halted at 34.Related Article: UNCW Department hosts annual symposium this year discussing the opioid epidemicRead more here. WILMINGTON, NC (UNCW Sports) — Sophomore shortstop Greg Jones has been named Colonial Athletic Association Bill Brooks Player of the Year by the league’s coach after producing one of the most dominant offensive seasons in the history of the UNCW program.Jones, along with juniors Kep Brown and Cole Weiss, was named first-team All-CAA. Junior Jackson Meadows and sophomore Noah Bridges were named to the second team at second base and outfield, respectively.- Advertisement – last_img read more

read more